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College Diversity and Investment Incentives

Listed author(s):
  • Thomas Gall
  • Patrick Legros
  • Andrew Newman

    ()

    (Boston University)

We study the aggregate economic effects of diversity policies such as affirmative action in college admission. If agents are constrained in the side payments they can make, the free market allocation displays excessive segregation relative to the first-best. Affirmative action policies can restore diversity within colleges but also affect incentives to invest in pre-college scholastic achievement. Affirmative action policies that are achievement-based can increase aggregate investment and income, reduce inequality, and increase aggregate welfare relative to the free market outcome. They may also be more effective than decentralized policies such as cross-subsidization of students by colleges.

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File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Gall_Legros_Newman_2015_college-diversity-investment.pdf
File Function: First version, December 2014
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Paper provided by Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group in its series Working Papers with number 2015-001.

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Date of creation: Jan 2015
Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2015-001
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  1. Kevin Lang & Jee-Yeon K. Lehmann, 2012. "Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market: Theory and Empirics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(4), pages 959-1006, December.
  2. Thomas Gall & Patrick Legros & Andrew Newman, 2006. "The Timing of Education," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(2-3), pages 427-435, 04-05.
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