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Primate Evidence on the Late Health Effects of Early Life Adversity

Author

Listed:
  • Gabriella Conti

    () (University of Chicago, Harris School of Public Policy Studies)

  • Christopher Hansman

    () (Columbia University)

  • James J. Heckman

    () (University of Chicago)

  • Matthew F. X. Novak

    () (Central Oregon Community College)

  • Angela Ruggiero

    (NICHD)

  • Stephen J. Suomi

    () (NICHD)

Abstract

This paper exploits a unique ongoing experiment to analyze the effects of early rearing conditions on physical and mental health in a sample of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We analyze the health records of 231 monkeys which were randomly allocated at birth across three rearing conditions: Mother Rearing, Peer Rearing, and Surrogate Peer Rearing. We show that the lack of a secure attachment relationship in the early years engendered by adverse rearing conditions has detrimental long-term effects on health which are not compensated by a normal social environment later in life.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriella Conti & Christopher Hansman & James J. Heckman & Matthew F. X. Novak & Angela Ruggiero & Stephen J. Suomi, 2012. "Primate Evidence on the Late Health Effects of Early Life Adversity," Working Papers 2012-008, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2012-008
    Note: HI ECI
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    File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Conti_Hansman_etal_2012_primate-evidence.pdf
    File Function: First version, April 10, 2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joseph P. Romano & Michael Wolf, 2005. "Exact and Approximate Stepdown Methods for Multiple Hypothesis Testing," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 100, pages 94-108, March.
    2. James Heckman & Seong Hyeok Moon & Rodrigo Pinto & Peter Savelyev & Adam Yavitz, 2010. "Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of the evidence from the HighScope Perry Preschool Program," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 1(1), pages 1-46, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Arnaud Chevalier & Olivier Marie, 2013. "Economic Uncertainty, Parental Selection, and the Criminal Activity of the "Children of the Wall"," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 605, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Achyuta Adhvaryu & James Fenske & Namrata Kala & Anant Nyshadham, 2015. "Fetal origins of mental health: evidence from Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-15, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Gabriella Conti & James J. Heckman, 2012. "The Economics of Child Well-Being," NBER Working Papers 18466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. James J. Heckman & Stefano Mosso, 2014. "The Economics of Human Development and Social Mobility," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 689-733, August.
    5. Cole, Steven W. & Conti, Gabriella & Arevalo, Jesusa M. & Ruggiero, Angela M. & Heckman, James J. & Suomi, Stephen J., 2012. "Transcriptional Modulation of the Developing Immune System by Early Life Social Adversity," IZA Discussion Papers 6915, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Gabriella Conti & James J. Heckman, 2012. "The Developmental Approach to Child and Adult Health," NBER Working Papers 18664, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Jin, L. & Ziebarth, N.R., 2015. "Sleep and Human Capital: Evidence from Daylight Saving Time," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/27, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Kim, Young-Il & Lee, Jungmin, 2014. "The long-run impact of a traumatic experience on risk aversion," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 174-186.
    9. Anna Aizer & Flávio Cunha, 2012. "The Production of Human Capital: Endowments, Investments and Fertility," NBER Working Papers 18429, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rhesus monkeys; health; maternal behavior; social deprivation;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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