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Primate Evidence on the Late Health Effects of Early Life Adversity

  • Gabriella Conti

    ()

    (University of Chicago, Harris School of Public Policy Studies)

  • Christopher Hansman

    ()

    (Columbia University)

  • James J. Heckman

    ()

    (University of Chicago)

  • Matthew F. X. Novak

    ()

    (Central Oregon Community College)

  • Angela Ruggiero

    (NICHD)

  • Stephen J. Suomi

    ()

    (NICHD)

This paper exploits a unique ongoing experiment to analyze the effects of early rearing conditions on physical and mental health in a sample of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We analyze the health records of 231 monkeys which were randomly allocated at birth across three rearing conditions: Mother Rearing, Peer Rearing, and Surrogate Peer Rearing. We show that the lack of a secure attachment relationship in the early years engendered by adverse rearing conditions has detrimental long-term effects on health which are not compensated by a normal social environment later in life.

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File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Conti_Hansman_etal_2012_primate-evidence.pdf
File Function: First version, April 10, 2012
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Paper provided by Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group in its series Working Papers with number 2012-008.

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Date of creation: Apr 2012
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Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2012-008
Note: HI ECI
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.hceconomics.org/
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  1. Joseph Romano & Michael Wolf, 2003. "Exact and approximate stepdown methods for multiple hypothesis testing," Economics Working Papers 727, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  2. James J. Heckman & Seong Hyeok Moon & Rodrigo Pinto & Peter A. Savelyev & Adam Yavitz, 2010. "Analyzing Social Experiments as Implemented: A Reexamination of the Evidence From the HighScope Perry Preschool Program," Working Papers 201034, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
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