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Evaluating the effects of a targeted home visiting program on maternal and child health outcomes

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  • Sandner, Malte
  • Cornelissen, Thomas
  • Jungmann, Tanja
  • Herrmann, Peggy

Abstract

We evaluate the effects of home visiting targeted towards disadvantaged first-time mothers on maternal and child health outcomes. Our analysis exploits a randomized controlled trial and combines rich longitudinal survey data with unique administrative health data. In a context in which the target group has comprehensive health care access, we find no effects of home visiting on most types of health utilization, health behaviors, and physical health measures. However, the intervention has a positive effect on some maternal mental health outcomes, reducing depression reported in the survey data by eleven percentage points and prescription of psycholeptics recorded in the administrative data by seven percentage points.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandner, Malte & Cornelissen, Thomas & Jungmann, Tanja & Herrmann, Peggy, 2018. "Evaluating the effects of a targeted home visiting program on maternal and child health outcomes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 269-283.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:58:y:2018:i:c:p:269-283
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2018.02.008
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sandner, Malte & Thomsen, Stephan L., 2018. "The Effects of Universal Public Childcare Provision on Cases of Child Neglect and Abuse," IZA Discussion Papers 11687, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Mitchell, Mark, 2020. "The Development of Health and Human Capital Accumulation," MPRA Paper 103711, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Sandner, Malte, 2019. "Effects of early childhood intervention on fertility and maternal employment: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 159-181.
    4. Jonas Lau-Jensen Hirani & Hans Henrik Sievertsen & Miriam Wust, 2020. "The Timing of Early Interventions and Child and Maternal Health," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 20/720, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    5. Deirdre Coy & Orla Doyle, 2020. "Should Early Health Investments Work? Evidence from an RCT of a Home Visiting Programme," Working Papers 202006, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    6. Jonas Lau-Jensen Hirani & Hans Henrik Sievertsen & Miriam Wüst & Johannes Wohlfart, 2020. "Missing a Nurse Visit," CEBI working paper series 20-09, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. The Center for Economic Behavior and Inequality (CEBI).
    7. Jonas Lau-Jensen Hirani & Hans Henrik Sievertsen & Miriam Wüst & Johannes Wohlfart, 2020. "Missing a Nurse Visit," Discussion Papers 20-09, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    8. Malte Sandner & Stephan L. Thomsen & Libertad González Luna, 2020. "Preventing child maltreatment: Beneficial side effects of public childcare provision," Economics Working Papers 1744, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child health; Health inequality; Mental health; Early childhood intervention;

    JEL classification:

    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

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