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The Effects of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills on Migration Decisions

Listed author(s):
  • Bütikofer, Aline

    ()

    (Dept. of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration)

  • Peri, Giovanni

    ()

    (UC Davis)

There is growing evidence that cognitive and noncognitive skills affect the economic and social outcomes of individuals. In this paper, we analyze how they affect the migration decisions of individuals during their lifetimes. We use data that combine military enlistment and administrative records for the male population born in 1932 and 1933 in Norway. Records of interviews with a psychologist at age 18 allow us to construct an index of `sociability' and `adaptability' for each individual, as well as an index of cognitive ability, the intelligence quotient. We find that adaptability and cognitive ability have significant and positive impacts on the probability of an individual migrating out of his area, whether this involves rural{urban, long distance, or international migration. Adaptability has a particularly strong impact on migration for individuals with low cognitive skills, implying a strong positive selection of less educated migrants with respect to the (previously unobserved) adaptability skill. We also show that cognitive skills have a strong positive effect on the pre- and post-migration wage differential, whereas adaptability has no significant effect. Moreover, individuals with high cognitive ability migrate to areas with large wage returns to cognitive abilities, whereas this is not true for individuals with high adaptability. This evidence suggests that adaptability reduces the psychological cost of migrating, whereas cognitive skills increase the monetary returns associated with migration.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11250/2456156
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics in its series Discussion Paper Series in Economics with number 17/2017.

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Length: 51 pages
Date of creation: 19 Sep 2017
Handle: RePEc:hhs:nhheco:2017_017
Contact details of provider: Postal:
NHH, Department of Economics, Helleveien 30, N-5045 Bergen, Norway

Phone: +47 55 959 277
Fax: 5595 9100
Web page: http://www.nhh.no/sam/
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