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Job Search Monitoring and Unemployment Duration in Hungary: Evidence from a Randomised Control Trial

  • John Micklewright

    ()

    (School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton)

  • Nagy Gyula

    ()

    (Department of Human Resources, Corvinus University of Budapest)

The impact of the administration of unemployment benefits on time spent unemployed is a neglected issue in discussion of incentive effects in Central and Eastern Europe. We use Labour Force Survey data, ad-ministrative registers and inspection of benefit office practices to show that there is good reason to investigate this issue in Hungary. We then report on results from a field experiment of the impact of tightening the administration of benefits in which benefit claimants were randomly as-signed to treatment and control groups. Treatment has quite a large ef-fect on durations on benefit of women aged 30 and over while we find no effect for younger women or for men.

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File URL: http://www.econ.core.hu/doc/bwp/bwp/bwp0509.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences in its series Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market with number 0509.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:has:bworkp:0509
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  1. Bruce D. Meyer, 1995. "Lessons from the U.S. Unemployment Insurance Experiments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 91-131, March.
  2. Micklewright, John & Nagy, Gyula, 1999. "Living standards and incentives in transition: the implications of UI exhaustion in Hungary," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 297-319, September.
  3. Elena Bardasi & Ana Lasaosa & John Micklewright & Gyula Nagy, 1999. "Measuring the Generosity of Unemployment Benefit Systems: Evidence from Hungary and elsewhere in Central Europe," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 9908, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  4. Tito Boeri & Katherine Terrell, 2001. "Institutional Determinants of Labor Reallocation in Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 384, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  5. Dan A. Black & Jeffrey A. Smith & Mark C. Berger & Brett J. Noel, 2002. "Is the Threat of Reemployment Services More Effective than the Services Themselves? Experimental Evidence from the UI System," NBER Working Papers 8825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Dan A. Black & Jeffrey A. Smith & Mark C. Berger & Brett J. Noel, 2003. "Is the Threat of Reemployment Services More Effective Than the Services Themselves? Evidence from Random Assignment in the UI System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1313-1327, September.
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