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Why Migrants' Remittances Reduce Income Inequality in some Countries and not in Others?

Author

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  • Christian Hubert Ebeke

    () (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - UdA - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Maëlan Le Goff

    (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - UdA - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

According to the literature, the effect of remittances on income inequality in origin countries of migrants is not clear, whatever empirical approach is used. Aiming at clearing up this ambiguity, some authors took into account the historical, social or economic context of the home countries considered. The underlying idea of most of these studies is actually that the impact of remittances on income inequality depends on whom migrates, i.e. on the location migrants occupy in income distribution in their home country. However, to our knowledge, no macroeconomic study examining the remittances effect on inequality, consider the composition of migratory flows. To reveal at the macroeconomic level the position of migrants in income distribution at origin, we introduce in our equation of inequality non-linearities in the level of development of the recipient countries, in the costs of migration and in the level of brain drain. Using a panel sample of 80 developing countries over the period 1970-2000, and even by factoring in the endogeneity of remittances, this paper provides evidence of some characteristics of countries of origin in which there is an inequality-decreasing effect of remittances on income inequality. It turns out that countries belonging to the Mediterranean Basin have the characteristics revealed.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Hubert Ebeke & Maëlan Le Goff, 2011. "Why Migrants' Remittances Reduce Income Inequality in some Countries and not in Others?," Working Papers halshs-00554277, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00554277
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lisa CHAUVET & Marin FERRY & Patrick GUILLAUMONT & Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY & Sampawende J.-A. TAPSOBA & Laurent WAGNER, 2017. "Volatility Widens Inequality. Could Aid and Remittances Help?," Working Papers P158, FERDI.
    2. Muhammad Shahbaz & Ijaz Rehman & Nurul Mahdzan, 2014. "Linkages between income inequality, international remittances and economic growth in Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 1511-1535, May.
    3. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:169-178 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Petreski, Marjan & Jovanovic, Branimir, 2013. "Do Remittances Reduce Poverty and Inequality in the Western Balkans? Evidence from Macedonia," MPRA Paper 51413, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Douzounet Mallaye & Gaëlle Tatiana Timba & Urbain Thierry Yogo, 2015. "Oil Rent and Income Inequality in Developing Economies: Are They Friends or Foes?," Working Papers halshs-01100843, HAL.
    6. Gaëlle Tatiana TIMBA & Douzounet MALLAYE & Urbain Thierry YOGO, 2015. "Oil Rent and Income Inequality in Developing Economies: Are They Friends or Foes?," Working Papers 201502, CERDI.
    7. Filiz Garip, 2014. "The Impact of Migration and Remittances on Wealth Accumulation and Distribution in Rural Thailand," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 673-698, April.
    8. Bang, James T. & Mitra, Aniruddha & Wunnava, Phanindra V., 2016. "Do remittances improve income inequality? An instrumental variable quantile analysis of the Kenyan case," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 394-402.

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