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Worker Displacement in France

Author

Listed:
  • David Margolis

    (TEAM - Théories et Applications en Microéconomie et Macroéconomie - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

In this paper, we consider the impact of displacement (defined as separation from a stable job due to firm closure) on workers in France. We find that a large share of displaced workers find new jobs without experiencing any interruption in their employment histories and that falling into nonemployment seems to be a more transitory phenomenon for displaced workers than other separators. We find that the estimated effects of displacement on earnings in France is very sensitive to the measure of earnings used, as there seems to be a lot of part-year working that takes place in the years surrounding a displacement or other separation. Earnings changes for displaced workers in France seem to reflect a major difference between those who find new jobs quickly and those who do not. There is an annual earnings penalty of an additional 28 percent (relative to continuously employed workers) for those men who do not find new jobs in the year following their displacement, and this penalty is 47 percent for displaced women. However, this annual earnings penalty seems driven largely by people working fewer days per year, as the slow job finding penalty on average daily earnings is only 4 percent for displaced men and 20 percent for displaced women.

Suggested Citation

  • David Margolis, 2000. "Worker Displacement in France," Post-Print halshs-03724050, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-03724050
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-03724050
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jacobson, Louis S & LaLonde, Robert J & Sullivan, Daniel G, 1993. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 685-709, September.
    2. Louis S. Jacobson & Robert J. LaLonde & Daniel G. Sullivan, 1993. "Long-term earnings losses of high-seniority displaced workers," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, vol. 17(Nov), pages 2-20.
    3. Abowd, J.M. & Kramarz, F. & Margolis, D.N., 1998. "Minimum Wages and Employment in France and the United States," Papiers du Laboratoire de Microéconomie Appliquée 1998-12, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
    4. Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 145-176, February.
    5. Stevens, Ann Huff, 1997. "Persistent Effects of Job Displacement: The Importance of Multiple Job Losses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 165-188, January.
    6. Bruce C. Fallick, 1996. "A Review of the Recent Empirical Literature on Displaced Workers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 50(1), pages 5-16, October.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Displaced Workers; Earnings Losses; Nonemployment Durations; Part-Year Work; Matched Firm-Worker Panel Data; France; Licenciements pour raison économique; licenciements collectifs; pertes de revenus; durées sans emploi; carrières interrompues; données longitudinales appariées employeur-employé;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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