IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ptu/wpaper/w200614.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers: Evidence from a Matched Employer-Employee Data Set

Author

Listed:
  • Anabela Carneiro
  • Pedro Portugal

Abstract

This paper examines the long-term earnings losses of displaced workers in Portugal, using a nationally representative longitudinal linked employer-employee data set. The results show that four years after displacement the earnings of displaced workers remain around 9% (women) to 12% (men) below their counterfactual expected levels. The post-displacement earnings losses are mainly associated with the loss of tenure within the firm and, to a lesser extent, to the loss of sector-specific features. Furthermore, workers who experienced a spell of nonemployment are the most affected by job displacement. Finally, this study points to the importance of controlling for employers' characteristics in this type of wages-dynamic analysis, since there are systematic differences in earnings between displaced and non-displaced workers that stem from differences in firm characteristics. Ignoring them may confound the evaluation of the earnings losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Anabela Carneiro & Pedro Portugal, 2006. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers: Evidence from a Matched Employer-Employee Data Set," Working Papers w200614, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ptu:wpaper:w200614
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.bportugal.pt/sites/default/files/anexos/papers/wp200614.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lorenzo Caliendo & Luca David Opromolla & Fernando Parro & Alessandro Sforza, 2017. "Goods and Factor Market Integration: A Quantitative Assessment of the EU Enlargement," CEP Discussion Papers dp1494, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Bruce C. Fallick & John Haltiwanger & Erika McEntarfer, 2012. "Job-to-job flows and the consequences of job separations," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-73, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2015. "Losing Heart? The Effect of Job Displacement on Health," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 68(4), pages 833-861, August.
    4. Verónica Amarante & Rodrigo Arim & Andrés Dean, 2014. "The Effects of Being Out of the Labor Market on Subsequent Wages: Evidence for Uruguay," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 39-62, March.
    5. Anton Nilsson, 2015. "Who suffers from unemployment? The role of health and skills," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, December.
    6. Eliason, Marcus, 2011. "Assistant and auxiliary nurses in crisis times: earnings and employment following public sector job loss in the 1990s," Working Paper Series 2011:1, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    7. Kent Eliasson & Pär Hansson, 2016. "Are workers more vulnerable in tradable industries?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(2), pages 283-320, May.
    8. Giordano Mion & Luca David Opromolla, 2011. "Managers' Mobility, Trade Status and Wages," CEP Discussion Papers dp1044, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Sérgio Lagoa & Fátima Suleman, 2016. "Industry- and occupation-specific human capital: evidence from displaced workers," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(1), pages 44-68, April.
    10. Ossi Korkeamäki & Jukka Appelqvist & Tomi Kyyrä, "undated". "Quantile Regression Estimates of the Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers," EcoMod2007 23900045, EcoMod.
    11. Appelqvist, Jukka, 2007. "Wage and Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers in Finland," Discussion Papers 422, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Pedro Portugal, 2006. "Wage Setting in the Portuguese Labor Market: A Microeconomic Approach," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ptu:wpaper:w200614. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (DEE-NTD). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/bdpgvpt.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.