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The dark side of making transit irresistible: The example of France

  • Dominique Bouf

    ()

    (LET - Laboratoire d'économie des transports - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - École Nationale des Travaux Publics de l'État [ENTPE] - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • David A. Hensher

    (ITLS - Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies - University of Sydney)

The French experience in developing policies to reduce car use in metropolitan areas is presented in this paper as an illustration of the lack of recognition of the broader set of criteria on which specific policy frameworks should be judged. One of the major challenges, and often failings of policies focussed on reducing car use, is the lack of a structure that ensures that the downside impacts are not relocated to other parts of a system such that potential gains end up being eroded by the potential losses. We draw on experiences throughout France, as well as case studies in Lyon, to highlight the dark side of French transport policy promoting a switch from car to public transit and non-motorised modes, in terms of financial, equity and environmental outcomes.[This paper is based on research undertaken during a sabbatical year (2005–2006) at ITLS Sydney.]

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-00266224.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Publication status: Published in Transport Policy, Elsevier, 2007, 14 (6), pp. 523-532. <10.1016/j.tranpol.2007.09.002>
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00266224
DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2007.09.002
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00266224
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