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Role of Users in the Developing Eco-Innovation: Comparative case research in China and France

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  • Nathalie Lazaric

    () (GREDEG - Groupe de Recherche en Droit, Economie et Gestion - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Jun Jin

    (School of Management, Zhejiang University, China - Chercheur indépendant)

  • Ali Douai

    () (GREDEG - Groupe de Recherche en Droit, Economie et Gestion - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Cécile Ayerbe

    () (GREDEG - Groupe de Recherche en Droit, Economie et Gestion - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This article proposes a model of eco-innovation that emphasizes the role of users and regulation in the development and diffusion of eco-innovation products, by comparing the diffusion of two e-bike companies, CEP and Lvyan, from China and France. These cases show that diffusion of eco-innovation in China and France is strongly linked to the institutional context and specific consumer needs, highlighting the importance of involving users in the development and diffusion of eco-innovation in order to satisfy market demand, and increase profit and competitiveness in niche markets. It also shows that, to achieve a comprehensive picture, institutions and policy makers should adopt a coevolutionary approach to regulation that includes consideration of technology, uses and practices. The case of CEP reveals that regulation appropriate to the market fosters companies' eco-innovation; compared to the case of Lvyan which shows that irrelevant regulation can become a barrier to the diffusion of eco-innovations such as the e-bikes. The superior 'snob effects' of the French market are discussed and compared with the 'bandwagons effects' noted in the Chinese market.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathalie Lazaric & Jun Jin & Ali Douai & Cécile Ayerbe, 2014. "Role of Users in the Developing Eco-Innovation: Comparative case research in China and France," Post-Print halshs-01070168, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01070168
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01070168
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Innovation écologiques; Utilisateurs pionniers; Modèle d'affaires; système d'innovation; eco-innovation; user; e-bike; France; China;

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