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What time to adapt? The role of discretionary time in sustaining the climate change value-action gap

Listed author(s):
  • Chai, Andreas
  • Bradley, Graham
  • Lo, Alex Y.
  • Reser, Joseph

We investigate the role discretionary (non-working) time plays in sustaining the gap between individuals’ concern about climate change and their propensity to act on this concern by adopting sustainable consumption practices. Using recent Australian survey data on climate change adaptation, we find that while discretionary time is unrelated to concern about climate change, it is positively correlated with the propensity to adopt mitigating behavior. Moreover, we find that increasing discretionary time is associated with significant reductions in the gap between the concern that individuals express about climate change and their reporting of engagement in sustainable consumption practices.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/53461/1/MPRA_paper_53461.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 53461.

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Date of creation: 06 Feb 2014
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:53461
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