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Sustainable Consumption in an Evolutionary Framework: How to Foster Behavioural Change?

In: Crisis, Innovation and Sustainable Development

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  • Nathalie Lazaric
  • Vanessa Oltra

Abstract

This unique and informative book highlights the relationship between crisis, innovation, and sustainable development, and discusses the necessary conditions required to seize the ecological opportunity. The authors study the strength of change for building a new society, and the theoretical origins and political aspects of environmental concerns. They also sketch the outlines of a global governance system seeking to promote sustainable development.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathalie Lazaric & Vanessa Oltra, 2012. "Sustainable Consumption in an Evolutionary Framework: How to Foster Behavioural Change?," Chapters, in: Blandine Laperche & Nadine Levratto & Dimitri Uzunidis (ed.), Crisis, Innovation and Sustainable Development, chapter 3, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14579_3
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    Cited by:

    1. Kurt Dopfer, 2013. "Evolutionary Economics," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-08, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    2. Sophie BOUTILLIER & Blandine LAPERCHE & Fabienne PICARD, 2013. "L’économie de la fonctionnalité : perspective historique et illustration empirique [The economy of functionality: historical perspective and empirical illustration]," Working Papers 35, Réseau de Recherche sur l’Innovation. / Research Network on Innovation.
    3. Wilson, Caroline, 2014. "Evaluating communication to optimise consumer-directed energy efficiency interventions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 300-310.

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