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From Private to Public Common Agency

Listed author(s):
  • Bruno Versaevel

    ()

    (GATE - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - Ecole Normale Supérieure Lettres et Sciences Humaines - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Etienne Billette de Villemeur

    (GREMAQ - Groupe de recherche en économie mathématique et quantitative - UT1 - Université Toulouse 1 Capitole - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

This note establishes that two propositions in the theory of private common agency by Laussel and Le Breton (2001, J. Econ. Theory 100, 93-128) extend to a larger class of games, in which each principal’s gross monetary payoff does not depend exclusively on the quantities she receives. A new result is offered to demonstrate that Proposition 4.3 is robust to the introduction of negative externalities. An existing result is reinterpreted to show that Proposition 4.2 is robust to the introduction of positive externalities.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-00161728.

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Date of creation: 2003
Publication status: Published in Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, 2003, 111 (2), pp.305-309
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00161728
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00161728
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/

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  1. B. Douglas Bernheim & Michael D. Whinston, 1986. "Menu Auctions, Resource Allocation, and Economic Influence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 101(1), pages 1-31.
  2. Laussel, Didier & Le Breton, Michel, 1996. "Complements and substitutes in common agency," Ricerche Economiche, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 325-345, December.
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