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Capital-Market Imperfections and the Macroeconomic Dynamics of Small Indebted Economies

The present study departs from the conventional approach to world capital-market imperfections by relying on the notion of individual risk, rather than country risk. This difference of emphasis has important implications for the specification of intertemporal optimizing models of small indebted economies. In particular, deviations from uncovered interest parity emerge naturally in the present approach.

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Paper provided by International Economics Section, Departement of Economics Princeton University, in its series Princeton Studies in International Economics with number 82.

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Length: 64 pages
Date of creation: 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:prinfi:82
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International Finance Section, Department of Economics Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A

Phone: (609) 258-4000
Fax: (609) 258-6419
Web page: http://www.econ.princeton.edu/
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  1. Jonathan David Ostry & Carmen Reinhart, 1991. "Private Saving and Terms of Trade Shocks: Evidence From Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 91/100, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Rick Van der Ploeg & Tony Venables, 2011. "Harnessing windfall revenues: Optimal policies for resource-rich developing economies," Economics Series Working Papers 543, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Masao Ogaki & Jonathan David Ostry & Carmen Reinhart, 1995. "Saving Behavior in Low and Middle-Income Developing Countries: A Comparison," IMF Working Papers 95/3, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Kim, Jinill & Ruge-Murcia, Francisco J., 2009. "How much inflation is necessary to grease the wheels?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 365-377, April.
  5. Rick van der Ploeg & Anthony J Venables, 2010. "Absorbing A Windfall Of Foreign Exchange: Dutch disease dynamics," OxCarre Working Papers 052, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  6. Anthony J. Venables & William Maloney & Ari Kokko & Claudio Bravo Ortega & Daniel Lederman & Roberto Rigobón & José De Gregorio & Jesse Czelusta & Shamila A. Jayasuriya & Magnus Blomström & L. Colin X, 2007. "Natural Resources: Neither Curse nor Destiny," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 59538 edited by William Maloney & Daniel Lederman, January.
  7. repec:idb:brikps:59538 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Takashi Kano & James M. Nason, 2009. "Business cycle implications of internal consumption habit for New Keynesian models," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2009-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  9. Charles R. Hulten, 1996. "Infrastructure Capital and Economic Growth: How Well You Use It May Be More Important Than How Much You Have," NBER Working Papers 5847, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Reinhart, Carmen M. & Vegh, Carlos A., 1995. "Nominal interest rates, consumption booms, and lack of credibility: A quantitative examination," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 357-378, April.
  11. Esfahani, Hadi Salehi & Ramirez, Maria Teresa, 2003. "Institutions, infrastructure, and economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 443-477, April.
  12. Maurice Obstfeld, 1982. "Aggregate Spending and the Terms of Trade: Is There a Laursen-Metzler Effect?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 97(2), pages 251-270.
  13. Hansen Henrik & Dalgaard Carl-Johan, 2015. "The Return to Foreign Aid," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  14. Don Harding & Adrian Pagan, 2000. "Disecting the Cycle: A Methodological Investigation," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1164, Econometric Society.
  15. Jaewoo Lee & Jonathan David Ostry & Alessandro Prati & Luca Antonio Ricci & Gian-Maria Milesi-Ferretti, 2008. "Exchange Rate Assessments: CGER Methodologies," IMF Occasional Papers 261, International Monetary Fund.
  16. Kano, Takashi & Nason, James M., 2012. "Appendix: Business Cycle Implications of Internal Consumption Habit for New Keynesian Models," Discussion Papers 2012-08, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
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