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China's WTO accession

Author

Listed:
  • Colby, Hunter
  • Diao, Xinshen
  • Tuan, Francis

Abstract

This analysis examines the implications of WTO accession for China's domestic policies and institutions by identifying some of Chinese agricultural policies and institutional arrangements that may generate conflicts with WTO requirements and analyzing the nature and extent of the conflict that may be introduced by WTO accession. We differentiate three alternative ways that China's current domestic policy or institutions may conflict with or be incompatible with WTO accession: (1) the domestic policy or institution is expressly prohibited by WTO rules and principles; (2) the changes required by WTO accession impose additional costs on the government such that the existing policy or institutions are difficult to sustain; and (3) the changes required for WTO accession reduce the effectiveness of the policies or institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Colby, Hunter & Diao, Xinshen & Tuan, Francis, 2001. "China's WTO accession," TMD discussion papers 68, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:68
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jim Hansen & Francis Tuan & Linxiu Zhang & Agapi Somwaru, 2011. "Do China's agricultural policies matter for world commodity markets?," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(1), pages 6-25, January.
    2. Fang, Cheng & Beghin, John C., 2002. "Urban Demand for Edible Oils and Fats in China: Evidence from Household Survey Data," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 732-753, December.
    3. Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio & Robinson, Sherman & Thomas, Marcelle & Yanoma, Yukitsugu, 2001. "WTO, agriculture, and developing countries," TMD discussion papers 81, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Huan-Niemi, Ellen & Niemi, Jyrki S., 2009. "China’s growing food imports from the EU," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51541, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Renkow, Mitch, 2010. "Impacts of IFPRI's "priorities for pro-poor public investment" global research program:," Impact assessments 31, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Oskam, A.J. & Komen, M.H.C. & Wobst, P. & Yalew, A., 2004. "Trade policies and development of less-favoured areas: evidence from the literature," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 445-466, August.
    7. Anonymous, 2005. "Articles from Volume 1, Issue 1, 2005, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development," Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, vol. 1(1).
    8. Gould, Brian W. & Sabates, Ricardo, 2001. "The Structure Of Food Demand In Urban China: A Demand System Approach," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20778, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Alan Matthews, 2001. "The Possible Impact of China's WTO Membership on the WTO Agricultural Negotiations," Trinity Economics Papers 200115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    10. Carter, Colin A. & Li, Xianghong, 2002. "Implications of World Trade Organisation accession for China’s agricultural trade patterns," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 46(2), June.
    11. Niemi, Jyrki S. & Huan-Niemi, Ellen, 2002. "The Effects of China's Tariff Reductions on EU Agricultural Exports," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24839, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Diao, Xinshen & Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2003. "China's WTO accession: impacts on regional agricultural income-- a multi-region, general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 332-351, June.
    13. Diao, Xinshen & Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2002. "How China's WTO accession affects rural economy in the less-developed regions," TMD discussion papers 87, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Zhu, Jing, 2004. "Public investment and China's long-term food security under WTO," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 99-111, February.
    15. Aguero, Jorge M. & Gould, Brian W., 2003. "A Household Level Analysis of Food Expenditure Patterns in Urban China: 1995-2000," Discussion Papers 37598, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Babcock Institute for International Dairy Research and Development.
    16. Huan-Niemi, Ellen & Niemi, Jyrki S., 2008. "Empirical analysis of agricultural trade between EU and China: Explanation behind China's growing agrifood imports," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43962, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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