IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Trade, growth, and poverty in Zambia: Insights from a dynamic GE model

  • Buffie, Edward F.
  • Atolia, Manoj

We analyze how trade policy and aid affect poverty and economic development in a dynamic optimizing model that features a full array of imports (intermediates, consumer goods, and capital goods), transport and distribution costs, sector-specific capital, public investment in social and physical infrastructure, learning externalities, and a dualistic labor market. Our main finding is that policy packages that combine an escalated structure of protection with an escalated structure of export promotion score best; there is no support for the view that free trade or a low uniform tariff is approximately optimal.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0161893811000676
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Policy Modeling.

Volume (Year): 34 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 211-229

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:34:y:2012:i:2:p:211-229
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Bussolo, Maurizio & Mizala, Alejandra & Romaguera, Pilar, 2002. "Beyond Heckscher-Ohlin: trade and labour market interactions in a case study for Chile," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 24(7-8), pages 639-666, November.
  2. Harrison Glenn & Rutherford Thomas & Tarr David, . "Trade Liberalization, Poverty and Efficient Equity," EcoMod2002 330800032, EcoMod.
  3. Wichern, Raier & Hausner, Ulrich & Chiwele, Dennis K., 1999. "Impediments to agricultural growth in Zambia:," TMD discussion papers 47, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Patricia Justino & Julie Litchfield & Hung Thai Pham, 2008. "Poverty Dynamics During Trade Reform: Evidence From Rural Vietnam," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(2), pages 166-192, 06.
  5. Davies, Rob & Rattso, Jorn & Torvik, Ragnar, 1998. "Short-Run Consequences of Trade Liberalization: A Computable General Equilibrium Model of Zimbabwe," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 305-333, June.
  6. Kubota, Keiko, 2000. "Fiscal constraints, collection costs, and trade policies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2366, The World Bank.
  7. Harrison, Glenn W. & Rutherford, Thomas F. & Tarr, David G., 2003. "Trade liberalization, poverty and efficient equity," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 97-128, June.
  8. Naude, Willem & Coetzee, Rian, 2004. "Globalisation and inequality in South Africa: modelling the labour market transmission," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(8-9), pages 911-925, December.
  9. World Bank, 2005. "Agricultural Growth for the Poor : An Agenda for Development," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7247, June.
  10. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
  11. Stifel, David C. & Thorbecke, Erik, 2003. "A dual-dual CGE model of an archetype African economy: trade reform, migration and poverty," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 207-235, April.
  12. De Maio, Lorenzo & Stewart, Frances & van der Hoeven, Rolph, 1999. "Computable General Equilibrium Models, Adjustment and the Poor in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 453-470, March.
  13. Gelan, Ayele, 2002. "Trade liberalisation and urban-rural linkages: a CGE analysis for Ethiopia," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 24(7-8), pages 707-738, November.
  14. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Go, Delfin S., 1998. "The Simplest Dynamic General-Equilibrium Model of an Open Economy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 677-714, December.
  15. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521004268 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Cororaton, Caesar B. & Cockburn, John, 2007. "Trade reform and poverty--Lessons from the Philippines: A CGE-microsimulation analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 141-163.
  17. Letiche, John M., 2010. "Transforming sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 163-175, March.
  18. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521782234 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Pinto Moreira, Emmanuel & Bayraktar, Nihal, 2008. "Foreign aid, growth and poverty: A policy framework for Niger," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 523-539.
  20. Jung, Hong-Sang & Thorbecke, Erik, 2003. "The impact of public education expenditure on human capital, growth, and poverty in Tanzania and Zambia: a general equilibrium approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(8), pages 701-725, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:34:y:2012:i:2:p:211-229. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.