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Securitization and the fixed-rate mortgage

Fixed-rate mortgages (FRMs) dominate the U.S. mortgage market, with important consequences for monetary policy, household risk management, and financial stability. In this paper, we show that the share of FRMs is sharply lower when mortgages are difficult to securitize. Our analysis exploits plausibly exogenous variation in access to liquid securitization markets generated by a regulatory cutoff and time variation in private securitization activity. We interpret our findings as evidence that lenders are reluctant to retain the prepayment and interest rate risk embedded in FRMs. The form of securitization (private versus government-backed) has little effect on FRM supply during periods when private securitization markets are well-functioning.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its series Staff Reports with number 594.

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Length: 77 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision: 01 Jun 2014
Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:594
Note: For a published version of this report, see Andreas Fuster and James Vickery, "Securitization and the Fixed-Rate Mortgage," Review of Financial Studies 28, no. 1 (January 2015): 176-211.
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  1. Jean Tirole, 2010. "Illiquidity and all its Friends," Working Papers 2010.78, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  2. Ralph S.J Koijen & Otto Van Hemert & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, 2007. "Mortgage Timing," NBER Working Papers 13361, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  7. Elul, Ronel, 2011. "Securitization and mortgage default," Working Papers 09-21, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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  9. James Vickery & Joshua Wright, 2013. "TBA trading and liquidity in the agency MBS market," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 1-18.
  10. Schwartz, Eduardo S & Torous, Walter N, 1989. " Prepayment and the Valuation of Mortgage-Backed Securities," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(2), pages 375-92, June.
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  12. Kenneth A. Froot & David S. Scharfstein & Jeremy C. Stein, 1992. "Risk Management: Coordinating Corporate Investment and Financing Policies," NBER Working Papers 4084, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Elena Loutskina & Philip E. Strahan, 2009. "Securitization and the Declining Impact of Bank Finance on Loan Supply: Evidence from Mortgage Originations," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(2), pages 861-889, 04.
  14. Kenneth A. Froot & Jeremy C. Stein, 1996. "Risk Management, Capital Budgeting and Capital Structure Policy for Financial Institutions: An Integrated Approach," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 96-28, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
  15. Paul Calem & Francisco Covas & Jason Wu, 2013. "The Impact of the 2007 Liquidity Shock on Bank Jumbo Mortgage Lending," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45, pages 59-91, 08.
  16. Toni Dechario & Patricia C. Mosser & Joseph Tracy & James Vickery & Joshua Wright, 2010. "A private lender cooperative model for residential mortgage finance," Staff Reports 466, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  17. Benjamin J. Keys & Tanmoy Mukherjee & Amit Seru & Vikrant Vig, 2010. "Did Securitization Lead to Lax Screening? Evidence from Subprime Loans," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 307-362.
  18. Douglas Almond & Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. & Amanda E. Kowalski & Heidi Williams, 2008. "Estimating Marginal Returns to Medical Care: Evidence from At-Risk Newborns," NBER Working Papers 14522, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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