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Codes of conduct, private information, and repeated games

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  • Juan I. Block
  • David K. Levine

Abstract

We examine self-referential games in which there is a chance of understanding an opponent’s intentions. Our main focus is on the interaction of two sources of information about opponents’ play: direct observation of the opponent’s code-of-conduct, and indirect observation of the opponent’s play in a repeated setting.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan I. Block & David K. Levine, 2012. "Codes of conduct, private information, and repeated games," Working Papers 2012-031, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2012-031
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Binmore, Ken & McCarthy, John & Ponti, Giovanni & Samuelson, Larry & Shaked, Avner, 2002. "A Backward Induction Experiment," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 48-88, May.
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    11. Drew Fudenberg & David Levine & Eric Maskin, 2008. "The Folk Theorem With Imperfect Public Information," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: A Long-Run Collaboration On Long-Run Games, chapter 12, pages 231-273 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    12. Drew Fudenberg & David K. Levine, 2008. "The Nash-threats folk theorem with communication and approximate common knowledge in two player games," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: A Long-Run Collaboration On Long-Run Games, chapter 15, pages 331-343 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    13. Takuo Sugaya, 2011. "Folk Theorem in Repeated Games with Private Monitoring," Working Papers 1303, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..
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    Cited by:

    1. Rohan Dutta & David K Levine & Salvatore Modica, 2018. "Peer Monitoring, Ostracism and the Internalization of Social Norms," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000001449, David K. Levine.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Game theory;

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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