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Every Little Bit Counts: The Impact of High-speed Internet on the Transition to College

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This paper investigates the effects of high-speed Internet on students' college application decisions. We link the diffusion of zip code-level residential broadband Internet to millions of PSAT and SAT takers' college testing and application outcomes and find that students with access to high-speed Internet in their junior year of high school perform better on the SAT and apply to a higher number and more expansive set of colleges. Effects appear to be concentrated among higher-SES students, indicating that while, on average, high-speed Internet improved students' postsecondary outcomes, it may have increased pre-existing inequities by primarily benefiting those with more resources.

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  • Lisa J. Dettling & Sarena Goodman & Jonathan Smith, 2015. "Every Little Bit Counts: The Impact of High-speed Internet on the Transition to College," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-108, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2015-108
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2015.108
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    Cited by:

    1. Kathrin Wernsdorf & Markus Nagler & Martin Watzinger, 2020. "ICT, Collaboration, and Science-Based Innovation: Evidence from BITNET," CESifo Working Paper Series 8646, CESifo.
    2. Yanguas, Maria Lucia, 2020. "Technology and educational choices: Evidence from a one-laptop-per-child program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C).
    3. Peter Leopold S. Bergman, 2016. "Technology Adoption in Education: Usage, Spillovers and Student Achievement," CESifo Working Paper Series 6101, CESifo.
    4. Adair Morse & Karen Pence, 2020. "Technological Innovation and Discrimination in Household Finance," NBER Working Papers 26739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Samara R. Gunter, 2019. "Your biggest refund, guaranteed? Internet access, tax filing method, and reported tax liability," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 26(3), pages 536-570, June.
    6. David J. Deming & Michael Lovenheim & Richard Patterson, 2018. "The Competitive Effects of Online Education," NBER Chapters, in: Productivity in Higher Education, pages 259-290, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    Keywords

    Broadband; College Choice; Undermatch;

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