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Structural Change and Global Trade

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Abstract

Services, which are less traded than goods, rose from 58 percent of world expenditure in 1970 to 79 percent in 2015. In a trade model featuring nonhomothetic preferences and input-output linkages, we find that such structural change has restrained the growth in world trade to GDP by 16 percentage points over this period. This magnitude is similar to how much declining trade costs have boosted openness. Moreover, structural change dampens the measured gains from trade by incorporating endogenous responses of expenditure shares to the trade regime. Ongoing structural change implies declining openness, even absent rising protectionism.

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  • Logan T. Lewis & Ryan Monarch & Michael Sposi & Jing Zhang, 2018. "Structural Change and Global Trade," Globalization Institute Working Papers 333, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:feddgw:333
    DOI: 10.24149/gwp333r2
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    Cited by:

    1. Ricardo Reyes-Heroles, 2018. "Globalization and Structural Change in the United States: A Quantitative Assessment," 2018 Meeting Papers 1027, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Khan, Muhammad Aamir, 2020. "Cross sectoral linkages to explain structural transformation in Nepal," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 221-235.
    3. William F. Lincoln & Andrew H. McCallum & Michael Siemer, 2019. "The Great Recession and a Missing Generation of Exporters," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 67(4), pages 703-745, December.
    4. Michael Sposi & Jing Zhang & Kei-Mu Yi, 2018. "Accounting for Structural Change Over Time: A Case Study of Three Middle-Income Countries," 2018 Meeting Papers 1141, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Diego Comin & Danial Lashkari & Martí Mestieri, 2021. "Structural Change With Long‐Run Income and Price Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 89(1), pages 311-374, January.
    6. Michael Sposi & Jing Zhang & Kei-Mu Yi, 2019. "Structural Change and Deindustrialization," 2019 Meeting Papers 1328, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Benjamin N. Dennis & Talan B. İşcan, 2020. "Structural change and global trade flows: Does an emerging giant matter?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 1191-1231, November.
    8. Andrea Papetti, 2021. "Population aging, relative prices and capital flows across the globe," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1333, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Saad, Ayhab F., 2021. "Institutional change in the global economy: How trade reform can be detrimental to welfare," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 97-110.
    10. Phong B. Dao, 2021. "A CUSUM-Based Approach for Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Wind Turbines," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 14(11), pages 1-19, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization; structural change; international trade;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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