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Can the U.S. Interbank Market Be Revived?

Author

Listed:
  • Kyungmin Kim
  • Antoine Martin
  • Ed Nosal

Abstract

Large-scale asset purchases by the Federal Reserve as well as new Basel III banking regulations have led to important changes in U.S. money markets. Most notably, the interbank market has essentially disappeared with the dramatic increase in excess reserves held by banks. We build a model in the tradition of Poole (1968) to study whether interbank market activity can be revived if the supply of excess reserves is decreased sufficiently. We show that it may not be possible to revive the market to precrisis volumes due to costs associated with recent banking regulations. Although the volume of interbank trade may initially increase as excess reserves are decreased from their current abundant levels, the new regulations may engender changes in market structure that result in interbank trading being completely replaced by nonbank lending to banks when excess reserves become scarce. This nonmonotonic response of interbank trading volume to reductions in excess reserves may lead to misleading forecasts about future fed funds prices and quantities when/if the Fed begins to normalize its balance sheet by reducing excess reserves.

Suggested Citation

  • Kyungmin Kim & Antoine Martin & Ed Nosal, 2018. "Can the U.S. Interbank Market Be Revived?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2018-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2018-13
    DOI: 10.29338/wp2018-13
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gara Afonso & Ricardo Lagos, 2015. "Trade Dynamics in the Market for Federal Funds," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 83, pages 263-313, January.
    2. Roc Armenter & Benjamin Lester, 2017. "Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy Implementation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 23, pages 212-235, January.
    3. Han Chen & Jim Clouse & Jane Ihrig & Elizabeth Klee, 2016. "The Federal Reserve's Tools for Policy Normalization in a Preferred Habitat Model of Financial Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(5), pages 921-955, August.
    4. William Poole, 1968. "Commercial Bank Reserve Management In A Stochastic Model: Implications For Monetary Policy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 23(5), pages 769-791, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fiorella De Fiore & Marie Hoerova & Harald Uhlig, 2018. "Money Markets, Collateral and Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 25319, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Albertazzi, Ugo & Barbiero, Francesca & Marqués-Ibáñez, David & Popov, Alexander & Rodriguez d’Acri, Costanza & Vlassopoulos, Thomas, 2020. "Monetary policy and bank stability: the analytical toolbox reviewed," Working Paper Series 2377, European Central Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    interbank market; monetary policy implementation; balance sheet costs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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