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Rent Building, Rent Sharing A Panel Country-Industry Empirical Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Maarek

    () (THEMA, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise)

  • Philippe Askenazy

    () (Paris School of Economic-CNRS, Cepremap, IZA and Banque de France)

  • Gilbert Cette

    () (Banque de France and Université de la Méditerranée (DEFI))

Abstract

This paper aims to clarify the role of market regulations in rent creation and rent sharing. For each country-industry-year observation, the rent size (RS), measured by the value added price relative to the GDP price, is assumed to depend solely on direct anti-competitive regulations (ACR) on services and goods. The second step explains the rent sharing process by using the impact of our RS measure on the capital share. ACR on the good market increases rent size. RS increases the capital share but the magnitude highly depends on the bargaining power of the two alternative beneficiaries: workers and upstream industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Maarek & Philippe Askenazy & Gilbert Cette, 2012. "Rent Building, Rent Sharing A Panel Country-Industry Empirical Analysis," THEMA Working Papers 2012-33, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  • Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2012-33
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    File URL: http://thema.u-cergy.fr/IMG/documents/2012-33.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Van Reenen, 1996. "The Creation and Capture of Rents: Wages and Innovation in a Panel of U. K. Companies," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(1), pages 195-226.
    2. Hernando Zuleta & Andrew T. Young, 2011. "Do Unions Increase Labor’s Shares? Evidence from US Industry-Level Data," Working Papers 10-06, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    3. Olivier Blanchard & Francesco Giavazzi, 2003. "Macroeconomic Effects of Regulation and Deregulation in Goods and Labor Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(3), pages 879-907.
    4. Renaud Bourlès & Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez & Jacques Mairesse & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2013. "Do Product Market Regulations In Upstream Sectors Curb Productivity Growth? Panel Data Evidence For OECD Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(5), pages 1750-1768, December.
    5. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 2009. "The Economics of Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262012634, January.
    6. Douglas Gollin, 2002. "Getting Income Shares Right," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 458-474, April.
    7. Andrea Bassanini & Romain Duval, 2009. "Unemployment, institutions, and reform complementarities: re-assessing the aggregate evidence for OECD countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 40-59, Spring.
    8. Chevalier, Judith A & Scharfstein, David S, 1996. "Capital-Market Imperfections and Countercyclical Markups: Theory and Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 703-725, September.
    9. Machin, Stephen & Van Reenen, John, 1993. "Profit Margins and the Business Cycle: Evidence from UK Manufacturing Firms," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(1), pages 29-50, March.
    10. Ghazala Azmat & Alan Manning & John Van Reenen, 2007. "Privatization, Entry Regulation and the Decline of Labor's Share of GDP: A Cross-Country Analysis of the Network Industries," CEP Discussion Papers dp0806, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    11. Spector, David, 2004. "Competition and the capital-labor conflict," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 25-38, February.
    12. Young, Andrew T., 2010. "One of the things we know that ain't so: Is US labor's share relatively stable?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 90-102, March.
    13. Nicoletti, Giuseppe & Pryor, Frederic L., 2006. "Subjective and objective measures of governmental regulations in OECD nations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 433-449, March.
    14. Paul Conway & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2006. "Product Market Regulation in the Non-Manufacturing Sectors of OECD Countries: Measurement and Highlights," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 530, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez & Jacques Mairesse, 2016. "Product and Labour Market Regulations, Production Prices, Wages and Productivity," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 7(2).
    2. Cette, G. & Lopez, J. & Mairesse, J., 2016. "What is the macroeconomic impact of ambitious structural reforms on product and labour markets?," Rue de la Banque, Banque de France, issue 27, june..
    3. aus dem Moore, Nils, 2014. "Shifting the Burden of Corporate Taxes: Heterogeneity in Direct Wage Incidence," Ruhr Economic Papers 531, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    4. Cette, G. & Lopez, J. & Mairesse, J., 2015. "Les effets macroéconomiques sur la productivité et les prix de vastes réformes structurelles sur les marchés des biens et du travail," Bulletin de la Banque de France, Banque de France, issue 199, pages 1-19.
    5. Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez & Jacques Mairesse, 2016. "Market Regulations, Prices, and Productivity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 104-108, May.
    6. Nils aus dem Moore, 2014. "Shifting the Burden of Corporate Taxes: Heterogeneity in Direct Wage Incidence," Ruhr Economic Papers 0531, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    7. repec:zbw:rwirep:0531 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Rents; capital share; prices; market regulations; output gap; unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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