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Student awareness of costs and benefits of educational decisions: effects of an information campaign

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  • McGuigan, Martin
  • McNally, Sandra
  • Wyness, Gill

Abstract

Many students appear to leave full-time education too soon, despite the possibility of high returns from further investment in their education. One contributory factor may be insufficient information about the potential consequences of their choices. We investigate students’ receptiveness to an information campaign about the costs and benefits of pursuing postcompulsory education. Our results show that students with higher expected net benefits from accessing information are more likely to avail themselves of the opportunity presented by our experiment. Their intention to stay on in post-16 education is strongly affected by the experiment, though not their intention to apply to university. Effects are heterogeneous by family background and gender.

Suggested Citation

  • McGuigan, Martin & McNally, Sandra & Wyness, Gill, 2016. "Student awareness of costs and benefits of educational decisions: effects of an information campaign," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68896, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:68896
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:64:y:2018:i:c:p:313-342 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Damgaard, Mette Trier & Nielsen, Helena Skyt, 2018. "Nudging in education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 313-342.
    3. Lergetporer, Philipp & Werner, Katharina & Woessmann, Ludger, 2018. "Does Ignorance of Economic Returns and Costs Explain the Educational Aspiration Gap? Evidence from Representative Survey Experiments," IZA Discussion Papers 11453, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. repec:ces:ifobei:82 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "Raising aspirations and higher education: evidence from the UK’s Widening Participation policy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1188, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Frauke H. Peter & C. Katharina Spieß & Vaishali Zambre, 2018. "Informing Students about College: An Efficient Way to Decrease the Socio-Economic Gap in Enrollment: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1770, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. repec:eee:labeco:v:47:y:2017:i:c:p:48-63 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Bertoni, M.; Corazzini, L.; Robone, S.;, 2017. "The Good Outcomes of Bad News. A Randomized Field Experiment on Formatting Breast Cancer Screening Invitations," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/27, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Ran Abramitzky & Victor Lavy & Santiago Pérez, 2018. "The Long-Term Spillover Effects of Changes in the Return to Schooling," NBER Working Papers 24515, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Bertoni, Marco & Corazzini, Luca & Robone, Silvana, 2019. "Promoting Breast Cancer Screening Take-Ups with Zero Cost: Evidence from an Experiment on Formatting Invitation Letters in Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 12193, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:125-141 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Peter, Frauke H. & Zambre, Vaishali, 2017. "Intended college enrollment and educational inequality: Do students lack information?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 125-141.

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    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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