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Information and College Access: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment

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  • Philip Oreopoulos
  • Ryan Dunn

Abstract

High school students from disadvantaged high schools in Toronto were invited to take two surveys, about three weeks apart. Half of the students taking the first survey were also shown a 3 minute video about the benefits of post secondary education (PSE) and invited to try out a financial-aid calculator. Most students' perceived returns to PSE were high, even among those not expecting to continue. Those exposed to the video, especially those initially unsure about their own educational attainment, reported significantly higher expected returns, lower concerns about costs, and expressed greater likelihood of PSE attainment.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Oreopoulos & Ryan Dunn, 2012. "Information and College Access: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 18551, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18551
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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