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Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes

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  • Achyuta Adhvaryu

    (MEPH Health Policy and Administration, Yale University)

  • Anant Nyshadham

    (Department of Economics, Yale University)

Abstract

Self-selection into healthcare options on the basis of severity likely biases estimates of the effects of healthcare choice on health outcomes. Using an instrumental variables strategy which exploits exogenous variation in the cost of formal-sector care, we show that using such care to treat acute sickness decreases the incidence of fever and malaria in young children in Tanzania. Compared to the instrumental variables estimates, ordinary least squares estimates significantly understate the effects of formal-sector healthcare use on health outcomes. Improved information and more timely treatment, rather than greater access to medicines, seem to be the primary mechanisms for this effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes," Working Papers 994, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:994
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    Cited by:

    1. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Labor Complementarities and Health in the Agricultural Household," Working Papers 996, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    2. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Labor Supply, Schooling and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania," Working Papers 995, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Achyuta R. Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2012. "Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 364-396.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    healthcare; information; child health; Tanzania;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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