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Learning in Health Care: Evidence of Learning about Clinician Quality in Tanzania

  • Leonard, Kenneth L

Learning is an important force for progress in developing countries and may represent a significant underutilized resource in health care. Using data from rural Tanzania, we show that households value quality at health facilities and that the value they place on at least two aspects of quality is increasing with the tenure of the clinician. The fact that patients increasingly prefer good clinicians and avoid bad clinicians as time passes and that the value they place on quality plateaus after about 5 years is strong evidence for learning. The fact that they increasingly choose better clinicians suggests that learning improves outcomes.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/511192
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 55 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 531-55

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2007:v:55:i:3:p:531-55
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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  1. Timothy Besley & Anne Case, 1994. "Diffusion as a Learning Process: Evidence from HYV Cotton," Working Papers 228, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
  2. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521747387, September.
  3. repec:pri:rpdevs:besley_case_diffusion is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Munshi, Kaivan, 2004. "Social learning in a heterogeneous population: technology diffusion in the Indian Green Revolution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 185-213, February.
  5. Leonard, Kenneth L., 2003. "African traditional healers and outcome-contingent contracts in health care," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 1-22, June.
  6. repec:pri:rpdevs:besley_case_diffusion.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Kenneth Leonard & Joshua Graff Zivin, 2003. "Outcome Versus Service Based Payment in Health Care: Lessons from African Traditional Healers," NBER Working Papers 9797, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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