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Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Adhvaryu, Achyuta

    (Yale University)

  • Nyshadham, Anant

    (Yale University)

Abstract

Self-selection into healthcare options biases estimates of the effects of healthcare on health outcomes. We exploit exogenous variation in the cost of formal-sector care to show that the use of such care improves short-term health outcomes for acutely ill children in Tanzania. Better treatment-specific information, rather than greater access to medicines, appears to be the primary mechanism for this effect: children who use formal-sector care are as a result more likely to get timely treatment and adhere to their medications.

Suggested Citation

  • Adhvaryu, Achyuta & Nyshadham, Anant, 2011. "Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes," Working Papers 88, Yale University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:yaleco:88
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    File URL: http://economics.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/Working-Papers/wp000/ddp0088.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Labor Complementarities and Health in the Agricultural Household," Working Papers 996, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    2. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Labor Supply, Schooling and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania," Working Papers 995, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Achyuta R. Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2012. "Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 364-396.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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