IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/jhriss/v46y2012ii1p364-396.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania

Author

Listed:
  • Achyuta R. Adhvaryu
  • Anant Nyshadham

Abstract

We study the effects of accessing better healthcare on the schooling and labor supply decisions of sick children in Tanzania. Using variation in the cost of formal-sector healthcare to predict treatment choice, we show that accessing better healthcare decreases length of illness and changes children’s allocation of time to school and work. Children attend school for more days per week—but not for more hours per day—as a result of accessing better healthcare. There are no significant effects on child labor, but the results suggest that time spent in physically strenuous activities such as farming and herding increases.

Suggested Citation

  • Achyuta R. Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2012. "Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 364-396.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2012:ii:1:p:364-396
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/47/2/364
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes," Working Papers 994, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    2. Germano Mwabu, 2009. "The Production of Child Health in Kenya: A Structural Model of Birth Weight," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(2), pages 212-260, March.
    3. Kruger, Diana I., 2007. "Coffee production effects on child labor and schooling in rural Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 448-463, March.
    4. Harsha Thirumurthy & Joshua Graff Zivin & Markus Goldstein, 2008. "The Economic Impact of AIDS Treatment: Labor Supply in Western Kenya," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 511-552.
    5. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, January.
    6. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
    7. Gowrisankaran, Gautam & Town, Robert J., 1999. "Estimating the quality of care in hospitals using instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 747-767, December.
    8. Glewwe, Paul & Jacoby, Hanan G, 1995. "An Economic Analysis of Delayed Primary School Enrollment in a Low Income Country: The Role of Early Childhood Nutrition," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 156-169, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ghulam Abid & Binish Khan & Zeeshan Rafiq & Alia Ahmed, 2015. "Child Trade-Off Theory: A Theoretical Discussion on the Structure, Causes, Consequences and Eradication of Child Labor," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 4(1), pages 24-34, March.
    2. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes," Working Papers 994, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Labor Complementarities and Health in the Agricultural Household," Working Papers 996, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    4. Cheti Nicoletti & Valentina Tonei, 2017. "The response of parental time investments to the child’s skills and health," Discussion Papers 17/08, Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Adhvaryu, Achyuta & Nyshadham, Anant, 2017. "Health, Enterprise, and Labor Complementarity in the Household," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 91-111.
    6. Vellore Arthi & James Fenske, 2013. "Labour and Health in Colonial Nigeria," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _114, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    7. Nicoletti, Cheti & Tonei, Valentina, 2017. "The Response of Parental Time Investments to the Child's Skills and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 10993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Majid, Muhammad Farhan, 2015. "The persistent effects of in utero nutrition shocks over the life cycle: Evidence from Ramadan fasting," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 48-57.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2012:ii:1:p:364-396. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://jhr.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.