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Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania

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  • Achyuta R. Adhvaryu
  • Anant Nyshadham

Abstract

We study the effects of accessing better healthcare on the schooling and labor supply decisions of sick children in Tanzania. Using variation in the cost of formal-sector healthcare to predict treatment choice, we show that accessing better healthcare decreases length of illness and changes children’s allocation of time to school and work. Children attend school for more days per week—but not for more hours per day—as a result of accessing better healthcare. There are no significant effects on child labor, but the results suggest that time spent in physically strenuous activities such as farming and herding increases.

Suggested Citation

  • Achyuta R. Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2012. "Schooling, Child Labor, and the Returns to Healthcare in Tanzania," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 364-396.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2012:ii:1:p:364-396
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adhvaryu, Achyuta & Nyshadham, Anant, 2011. "Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes," Center Discussion Papers 107257, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
    2. Germano Mwabu, 2009. "The Production of Child Health in Kenya: A Structural Model of Birth Weight," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(2), pages 212-260, March.
    3. Kruger, Diana I., 2007. "Coffee production effects on child labor and schooling in rural Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 448-463, March.
    4. Harsha Thirumurthy & Joshua Graff Zivin & Markus Goldstein, 2008. "The Economic Impact of AIDS Treatment: Labor Supply in Western Kenya," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 511-552.
    5. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, January.
    6. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
    7. Gowrisankaran, Gautam & Town, Robert J., 1999. "Estimating the quality of care in hospitals using instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 747-767, December.
    8. Glewwe, Paul & Jacoby, Hanan G, 1995. "An Economic Analysis of Delayed Primary School Enrollment in a Low Income Country: The Role of Early Childhood Nutrition," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 156-169, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham, 2011. "Labor Complementarities and Health in the Agricultural Household," Working Papers 996, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    2. Nicoletti, Cheti & Tonei, Valentina, 2017. "The Response of Parental Time Investments to the Child's Skills and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 10993, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Vellore Arthi & James Fenske, 2013. "Labour and health in Colonial Nigeria," Working Papers 13032, Economic History Society.
    4. Vellore Arthi & James Fenske, 2013. "Labour and Health in Colonial Nigeria," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _114, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    5. Adhvaryu, Achyuta & Nyshadham, Anant, 2011. "Healthcare Choices, Information and Health Outcomes," Center Discussion Papers 107257, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
    6. Ghulam Abid & Binish Khan & Zeeshan Rafiq & Alia Ahmed, 2015. "Child Trade-Off Theory: A Theoretical Discussion on the Structure, Causes, Consequences and Eradication of Child Labor," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 4(1), pages 24-34, March.
    7. Adhvaryu, Achyuta & Nyshadham, Anant, 2017. "Health, Enterprise, and Labor Complementarity in the Household," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 91-111.
    8. Majid, Muhammad Farhan, 2015. "The persistent effects of in utero nutrition shocks over the life cycle: Evidence from Ramadan fasting," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 48-57.

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