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Adaptation to Climate Change in Marine Capture Fisheries

Author

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  • Quentin Grafton

    () (Crawford School of Business and Government, College of Asia and Pacific, Australian National University)

Abstract

This paper responds to the challenge of how and when to adapt marine capture fisheries to climate change by: (1) providing a set of fisheries policy options to climate change; (2) developing a risk and vulnerability assessment and management decision-making framework for adaptation; and (3) describing the possible strategies and tactics for ex ante and ex post climate adaptation in the marine environment. Its contributions include: (1) a discussion of how management objectives and instruments influence resilience and adaptation; (2) a decision-making process to assess vulnerabilities to climate change and to manage adaptation responses; (3) an inter-temporal framework to assist decision-makers when to adapt; (4) a risk and simulation approach to confront the uncertainties of the possible losses due to climate change and the net benefits of adaptation; (5) an explanation of how adaptive co-management can promote flexible adaptation responses and also strengthen adaptation capacity; and (6) a selection of possible ‘win-win’ management actions.

Suggested Citation

  • Quentin Grafton, 2009. "Adaptation to Climate Change in Marine Capture Fisheries," Environmental Economics Research Hub Research Reports 0937, Environmental Economics Research Hub, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:eenhrr:0937
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    File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/research_units/eerh/pdf/EERH_RR37.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. R. Quentin Grafton & Tom Kompas & Pham Van Ha, 2009. "Cod Today and None Tomorrow: The Economic Value of a Marine Reserve," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(3), pages 454-469.
    2. Grafton, R. Quentin & Kompas, Tom, 2005. "Uncertainty and the active adaptive management of marine reserves," Marine Policy, Elsevier, pages 471-479.
    3. Quentin Grafton, R. & Kompas, Tom & McLoughlin, Richard & Rayns, Nick, 2007. "Benchmarking for fisheries governance," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 470-479, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. M. W. Pedersen & A. Kokkalis & H. Bardarson & S. Bonanomi & W. J. Boonstra & W. E. Butler & F. K. Diekert & N. Fouzai & M. Holma & R. E. Holt & K. Ø. Kvile & E. Nieminen & K. M. Ottosen & A. Richter &, 2016. "Trends in marine climate change research in the Nordic region since the first IPCC report," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 134(1), pages 147-161, January.
    2. Aguilar Ibarra, Alonso & Sanchez Vargas, Armando & Martinez Lopez, Benjamin, 2012. "Economic impacts of climate change on two Mexican coastal fisheries: Implications to food security," Economics Discussion Papers 2012-64, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Neil Holbrook & Johanna Johnson, 2014. "Climate change impacts and adaptation of commercial marine fisheries in Australia: a review of the science," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 124(4), pages 703-715, June.
    4. P. Leith & E. Ogier & G. Pecl & E. Hoshino & J. Davidson & M. Haward, 2014. "Towards a diagnostic approach to climate adaptation for fisheries," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 55-66, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate adaptation; climate change; fisheries;

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