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Inflation Dynamics and The Role of Oil Shocks: How Different Were the 1970s?


  • Benjamin Wong


This paper presents evidence on why inflation pass-through from oil shocks in the 21st century relative to the 1970s has dampened. First, results suggest global business cycle demand driven oil shocks are not inflationary. Second, there has been a reduction in inflation pass-through from oil supply and speculative oil demand shocks. Movements in oil inventories and production suggest oil supply and speculative oil demand shocks in the 1970s were different. Oil market participants expect higher oil prices to persist into the future. The analysis highlights the importance of modelling inventories as a means of capturing expectations in the oil market.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Wong, 2013. "Inflation Dynamics and The Role of Oil Shocks: How Different Were the 1970s?," CAMA Working Papers 2013-59, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:camaaa:2013-59

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin Wong, 2015. "Do Inflation Expectations Propagate the Inflationary Impact of Real Oil Price Shocks?: Evidence from the Michigan Survey," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(8), pages 1673-1689, December.
    2. Elekdag, Selim & Han, Fei, 2015. "What drives credit growth in emerging Asia?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1-13.
    3. Shiyi Chen & Dengke Chen & Wolfgang K. Härdle, 2014. "The Influence of Oil Price Shocks on China’s Macroeconomy : A Perspective of International Trade," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2014-063, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

    More about this item


    Oil Shocks; Time-Varying Parameters; Inflation Pass-through;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy


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