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Benjamin Wong

Personal Details

First Name:Benjamin
Middle Name:
Last Name:Wong
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwo145
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/benjaminwongshijie/
Terminal Degree:2014 Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis (CAMA); Crawford School of Public Policy; Australian National University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics
Monash Business School
Monash University

Melbourne, Australia
http://business.monash.edu/econometrics-and-business-statistics

: 03 990 52372
03 990 55474
Room 674, Menzies Building, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria, 3168
RePEc:edi:dxmonau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Amy Rice & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Measuring uncertainty and its impact on the New Zealand economy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2018/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  2. Güneş Kamber & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Global factors and trend inflation," BIS Working Papers 688, Bank for International Settlements.
  3. Benjamin Wong, 2017. "Incorporating relevant multivariate information for characterizing half-life with an application to purchasing power parity," CAMA Working Papers 2017-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  4. James Morley & Benjamin Wong, 2017. "Estimating and accounting for the output gap with large Bayesian vector autoregressions," CAMA Working Papers 2017-46, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  5. Benjamin Wong, 2017. "Historical decompositions for nonlinear vector autoregression models," CAMA Working Papers 2017-62, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  6. Günes Kamber & Gabriela Nodari & Benjamin Wong, 2016. "The Impact of Commodity Price Movements on the New Zealand Economy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2016/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  7. Günes Kamber & Benjamin Wong, 2016. "Testing an Interpretation of Core Inflation Measures in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2016/06, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  8. Gunes Kamber & James Morley & Benjamin Wong, 2016. "Intuitive and Reliable Estimates of the Output Gap from a Beveridge-Nelson Filter," Discussion Papers 2016-09, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  9. Miles Parker & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Exchange rate and commodity price pass‐through in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  10. Varang Wiriyawit & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Structural VARs, Deterministic and Stochastic Trends: Does Detrending Matter?," CAMA Working Papers 2014-46, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  11. Anella Munro & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Monetary Policy and Funding Spreads," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/07, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  12. Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Inflation Expectations and How it Explains the Inflationary Impact of Oil Price Shocks: Evidence from the Michigan Survey," CAMA Working Papers 2014-45, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  13. Benjamin Wong, 2013. "The Evolution of the U.S. Output-Inflation Tradeoff," CAMA Working Papers 2013-70, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  14. Benjamin Wong, 2013. "Inflation Dynamics and The Role of Oil Shocks: How Different Were the 1970s?," CAMA Working Papers 2013-59, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  15. Kam-Ki Tang & Benjamin ShiJie Wong, "undated". "The Ageing, Longevity and Crowding Out Effects on Private and Public Savings: Evidence from Dynamic Panel Analysis," MRG Discussion Paper Series 3409, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.

Articles

  1. James Morley & Benjamin Wong, 2020. "Estimating and accounting for the output gap with large Bayesian vector autoregressions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(1), pages 1-18, January.
  2. Kamber, Güneş & Wong, Benjamin, 2020. "Global factors and trend inflation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
  3. Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Time Series Econometerics," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 95(310), pages 399-400, September.
  4. Michael Callaghan & Enzo Cassino & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Opening the toolbox: how does the Reserve Bank analyse the world?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-14, April.
  5. Trung Duc Tran & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Measuring Uncertainty for New Zealand Using Data‐Rich Approach," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 52(3), pages 344-352, September.
  6. Günes Kamber & James Morley & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Intuitive and Reliable Estimates of the Output Gap from a Beveridge-Nelson Filter," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 550-566, July.
  7. Lucy Greig & Amy Rice & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Measuring Uncertainty and Its Impact on a Small Open Economy," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(1), pages 87-98, March.
  8. Wiriyawit Varang & Wong Benjamin, 2016. "Structural VARs, deterministic and stochastic trends: how much detrending matters for shock identification," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 20(2), pages 141-157, April.
  9. Benjamin Wong, 2015. "Do Inflation Expectations Propagate the Inflationary Impact of Real Oil Price Shocks?: Evidence from the Michigan Survey," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(8), pages 1673-1689, December.
  10. Benjamin Wong & Kam Ki Tang, 2013. "Do ageing economies save less? Evidence from OECD data," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 40(6), pages 591-605, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Amy Rice & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Measuring uncertainty and its impact on the New Zealand economy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2018/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Ricardo J. Caballero & Gunes Kamber, 2019. "On the Global Impact of Risk-off Shocks and Policy-put Frameworks," NBER Working Papers 26031, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Güneş Kamber & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Global factors and trend inflation," BIS Working Papers 688, Bank for International Settlements.

    Cited by:

    1. Hartigan, Luke & Morley, James, 2019. "A Factor Model Analysis of the Australian Economy and the Effects of Inflation Targeting," Working Papers 2019-10, University of Sydney, School of Economics, revised Nov 2019.
    2. Feldkircher, Martin & Lukmanova, Elizaveta & Tondl, Gabriele, 2019. "Global Factors Driving Inflation and Monetary Policy: A Global VAR Assessment," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 289, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    3. Clara De Luigi & Florian Huber & Josef Schreiner, 2019. "The impact of labor cost growth on inflation in selected CESEE countries," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue Q4/19, pages 56-78.
    4. Michael Callaghan & Enzo Cassino & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Opening the toolbox: how does the Reserve Bank analyse the world?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-14, April.

  3. James Morley & Benjamin Wong, 2017. "Estimating and accounting for the output gap with large Bayesian vector autoregressions," CAMA Working Papers 2017-46, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Matteo Barigozzi & Matteo Luciani, 2017. "Common Factors, Trends, and Cycles in Large Datasets," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-111, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Kamber, Güneş & Wong, Benjamin, 2020. "Global factors and trend inflation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    3. Murasawa, Yasutomo, 2019. "Bayesian multivariate Beveridge--Nelson decomposition of I(1) and I(2) series with cointegration," MPRA Paper 91979, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Günes Kamber & Gabriela Nodari & Benjamin Wong, 2016. "The Impact of Commodity Price Movements on the New Zealand Economy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2016/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Rebecca Williams, 2017. "Business cycle review: 2008 to present day," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, pages 1-22, March.
    2. Neroli Austin & Geordie Reid, 2017. "NZSIM: A model of the New Zealand economy for forecasting and policy analysis," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, pages 1-14, January.
    3. Michael Callaghan & Enzo Cassino & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Opening the toolbox: how does the Reserve Bank analyse the world?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-14, April.
    4. Pinshi, Christian P., 2018. "Les effets macroéconomiques de la chute des cours des produits de base: Evaluation sur la République démocratique du Congo
      [The Macroeconomic Effects of commodity bust: Assessment on Democratic Rep
      ," MPRA Paper 93130, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 0208.
    5. Philip R Lane & Livio Stracca, 2018. "Can appreciation be expansionary? Evidence from the euro area," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 33(94), pages 225-264.

  5. Gunes Kamber & James Morley & Benjamin Wong, 2016. "Intuitive and Reliable Estimates of the Output Gap from a Beveridge-Nelson Filter," Discussion Papers 2016-09, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Joshua C.C. Chan & Angelia L. Grant, 2016. "Reconciling output gaps: unobserved components model and Hodrick-Prescott filter," CAMA Working Papers 2016-44, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Camila Figueroa & Jorge Fornero & Pablo García, 2019. "Hindsight vs. Real time measurement of the output gap: Implications for the Phillips curve in the Chilean Case," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 854, Central Bank of Chile.
    3. Mihnea Constantinescu & Anh Dinh Minh Nguyen, 2017. "Unemployment or Credit: Who Holds The Potential? Results From a Small-Open Economy," Bank of Lithuania Discussion Paper Series 4, Bank of Lithuania.
    4. Ronald Miranda & Leonel Muinelo-Gallo, 2018. "The behavior of social transfers over the business cycle: empirical evidence of Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 18-15, Instituto de Economia - IECON.
    5. James Morley & Irina B Panovska, 2016. "Is Business Cycle Asymmetry Intrinsic in Industrialized Economies?," Discussion Papers 2016-12, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    6. Kamber, Güneş & Wong, Benjamin, 2020. "Global factors and trend inflation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    7. Morley, James & Wong, Benjamin, 2018. "Estimating and Accounting for the Output Gap with Large Bayesian Vector Autoregressions," Working Papers 2018-04, University of Sydney, School of Economics, revised Feb 2019.
    8. Eo, Yunjong & Morley, James, 2017. "Why has the US economy stagnated since the Great Recession?," Working Papers 2017-14, University of Sydney, School of Economics, revised Jun 2019.
    9. Quast, Josefine & Wolters, Maik H., 2019. "Reliable Real-time Output Gap Estimates Based on a Modified Hamilton Filter," Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203535, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Murasawa, Yasutomo, 2019. "Bayesian multivariate Beveridge--Nelson decomposition of I(1) and I(2) series with cointegration," MPRA Paper 91979, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Ekinci, Mehmet Fatih, 2019. "Intuitive and Reliable Estimates of Output Gap and Real Exchange Rate Cycles for Turkey," MPRA Paper 94698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Michael T. Owyang & Amy Y. Guisinger & Hannah Shell, 2018. "Comparing Measures of Potential Output," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, pages 297-316.
    13. Julien Champagne & Guillaume Poulin‐Bellisle & Rodrigo Sekkel, 2018. "The Real‐Time Properties of the Bank of Canada's Staff Output Gap Estimates," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(6), pages 1167-1188, September.
    14. Ademmer, Martin & Boysen-Hogrefe, Jens & Carstensen, Kai & Hauber, Philipp & Jannsen, Nils & Kooths, Stefan & Rossian, Thies & Stolzenburg, Ulrich, 2019. "Schätzung von Produktionspotenzial und -lücke: Eine Analyse des EU-Verfahrens und mögliche Verbesserungen," Kieler Beiträge zur Wirtschaftspolitik 19, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    15. Sun Xiaojin & Tsang Kwok Ping, 2019. "What cycles? Data detrending in DSGE models," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 23(3), pages 1-23, June.

  6. Miles Parker & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Exchange rate and commodity price pass‐through in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Günes Kamber & Gabriela Nodari & Benjamin Wong, 2016. "The Impact of Commodity Price Movements on the New Zealand Economy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2016/05, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    2. Daan Steenkamp, 2014. "How volatile are New Zealand’s terms of trade? An international comparison," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 77, pages 3-14, June.
    3. Michael Callaghan & Enzo Cassino & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Opening the toolbox: how does the Reserve Bank analyse the world?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-14, April.
    4. Miles Parker, 2014. "Exchange rate movements and consumer prices: some perspectives," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 77, pages 31-41, March.

  7. Varang Wiriyawit & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Structural VARs, Deterministic and Stochastic Trends: Does Detrending Matter?," CAMA Working Papers 2014-46, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Fei Han & Selim Elekdag, 2012. "What Drives Credit Growth in Emerging Asia?," IMF Working Papers 12/43, International Monetary Fund.

  8. Anella Munro & Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Monetary Policy and Funding Spreads," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2014/07, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Cited by:

    1. Bevan Cook & Daan Steenkamp, 2018. "Funding cost pass-through to mortgage rates," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2018/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

  9. Benjamin Wong, 2014. "Inflation Expectations and How it Explains the Inflationary Impact of Oil Price Shocks: Evidence from the Michigan Survey," CAMA Working Papers 2014-45, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Geiger & Johann Scharler, 2018. "How do consumers interpret the macroeconomic effects of oil price fluctuations? Evidence from U.S. survey data," Working Papers 2018-13, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    2. Bobeica, Elena & Ciccarelli, Matteo & Vansteenkiste, Isabel, 2019. "The link between labor cost and price inflation in the euro area," Working Paper Series 2235, European Central Bank.
    3. Hammoudeh, Shawkat & Reboredo, Juan C., 2018. "Oil price dynamics and market-based inflation expectations," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 484-491.
    4. Martin Geiger & Marios Zachariadis, 2019. "Assessing Expectations as a Monetary/Fiscal State-Dependent Phenomenon," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 01-2019, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    5. Elena Bobeica & Matteo Ciccarelli & Isabel Vansteenkiste, 2019. "The link between labor cost and price inflation in the euro area," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 848, Central Bank of Chile.
    6. Kamber, Güneş & Wong, Benjamin, 2020. "Global factors and trend inflation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    7. Morley, James & Wong, Benjamin, 2018. "Estimating and Accounting for the Output Gap with Large Bayesian Vector Autoregressions," Working Papers 2018-04, University of Sydney, School of Economics, revised Feb 2019.
    8. Basher, Syed Abul & Haug, Alfred A. & Sadorsky, Perry, 2019. "The impact of economic policy uncertainty and commodity prices on CARB country stock market volatility," MPRA Paper 96577, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Robert G Murphy & Adam Rohde, 2018. "Rational Bias in Inflation Expectations," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 44(1), pages 153-171, January.
    10. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Saten Kumar & Mathieu Pedemonte, 2018. "Inflation Expectations as a Policy Tool?," Working Papers 2019-06, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    11. Martin Geiger & Johann Scharler, 2018. "How do people interpret macroeconomic shocks? Evidence from U.S. survey data," Working Papers 2018-12, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    12. Jochen H. F. Güntner & Katharina Linsbauer, 2018. "The Effects of Oil Supply and Demand Shocks on U.S. Consumer Sentiment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(7), pages 1617-1644, October.
    13. Geiger, Martin & Scharler, Johann, 2016. "How do Macroeconomic Shocks affect Expectations? Lessons from Survey Data," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145747, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  10. Benjamin Wong, 2013. "The Evolution of the U.S. Output-Inflation Tradeoff," CAMA Working Papers 2013-70, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Donayre, Luiggi & Panovska, Irina, 2018. "U.S. wage growth and nonlinearities: The roles of inflation and unemployment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 273-292.

  11. Benjamin Wong, 2013. "Inflation Dynamics and The Role of Oil Shocks: How Different Were the 1970s?," CAMA Working Papers 2013-59, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin Wong, 2015. "Do inflation expectations propagate the inflationary impact of real oil price shocks?: Evidence from the Michigan survey," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2015/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    2. Fei Han & Selim Elekdag, 2012. "What Drives Credit Growth in Emerging Asia?," IMF Working Papers 12/43, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Shiyi Chen & Dengke Chen & Wolfgang K. Härdle, 2014. "The Influence of Oil Price Shocks on China’s Macroeconomy : A Perspective of International Trade," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2014-063, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Articles

  1. Kamber, Güneş & Wong, Benjamin, 2020. "Global factors and trend inflation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Günes Kamber & James Morley & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Intuitive and Reliable Estimates of the Output Gap from a Beveridge-Nelson Filter," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 550-566, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Lucy Greig & Amy Rice & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2018. "Measuring Uncertainty and Its Impact on a Small Open Economy," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(1), pages 87-98, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Gächter & Martin Geiger & Sebastian Stöckl, 2019. "Credit Intermediation and the Transmission of Macro-Financial Uncertainty: International Evidence," Arbeitspapiere 63, Liechtenstein-Institut.
    2. Michael Callaghan & Enzo Cassino & Tugrul Vehbi & Benjamin Wong, 2019. "Opening the toolbox: how does the Reserve Bank analyse the world?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-14, April.

  4. Wiriyawit Varang & Wong Benjamin, 2016. "Structural VARs, deterministic and stochastic trends: how much detrending matters for shock identification," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 20(2), pages 141-157, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Benjamin Wong, 2015. "Do Inflation Expectations Propagate the Inflationary Impact of Real Oil Price Shocks?: Evidence from the Michigan Survey," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(8), pages 1673-1689, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Benjamin Wong & Kam Ki Tang, 2013. "Do ageing economies save less? Evidence from OECD data," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 40(6), pages 591-605, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Loumrhari, Ghizlan, 2013. "Vieillissement démographique, longévité et épargne. Le cas du Maroc
      [Ageing population, longevity and save. The case of Morocco]
      ," MPRA Paper 50649, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Zheng Guo & Linchen Liu & Xuan Liu, 2016. "Population Aging, Marginal Propensity to Consume, and Economic Growth," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(9), pages 534-546, September.
    3. Misbah Tanveer Choudhry & Enrico Marelli & Marcello Signorelli, 2016. "Age dependency and labour productivity divergence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(50), pages 4823-4845, October.
    4. Gindra Kasnauskiene & Marija Andriuskaite, 2017. "Economic Implications Of Ageing Lithuanian Population," Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies, Faculty of Economics, Vilnius University, vol. 8(1).
    5. Marta Pascual-Sáez & David Cantarero-Prieto & María González-Diego, 2018. "Testing the effect of population ageing on national saving rates: panel data evidence from Europe," Working Papers. Collection B: Regional and sectoral economics 1803, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
    6. Ghizlan Loumrhari, 2014. "Ageing, Longevity and Savings: The Case of Morocco," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 344-352.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 21 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (17) 2013-10-18 2014-04-11 2014-06-14 2014-06-22 2015-01-26 2015-08-13 2016-06-09 2016-07-23 2016-08-28 2016-10-02 2017-01-29 2017-04-09 2017-04-09 2017-07-23 2018-02-26 2018-04-09 2019-09-02. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (8) 2014-04-11 2014-06-14 2015-01-26 2015-08-13 2016-08-28 2018-02-26 2018-04-09 2019-09-02. Author is listed
  3. NEP-ETS: Econometric Time Series (6) 2014-06-22 2015-08-13 2016-10-02 2017-04-09 2017-07-23 2017-07-23. Author is listed
  4. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (5) 2014-06-22 2015-08-13 2016-07-23 2017-07-23 2017-11-05. Author is listed
  5. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (4) 2015-08-13 2018-02-26 2018-04-09 2019-09-02
  6. NEP-FOR: Forecasting (4) 2016-07-23 2016-10-02 2017-01-29 2017-04-09
  7. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (4) 2014-06-22 2015-08-13 2017-07-23 2017-11-05
  8. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (3) 2014-04-11 2016-06-09 2019-09-02
  9. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (2) 2014-06-14 2015-08-13
  10. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (2) 2018-02-26 2018-04-09
  11. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2010-05-02
  12. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2015-01-26
  13. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2014-04-11

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