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Costs and Benefits of Dynamic Trading in a Lemons Market


  • Fuchs, William

    (University of CA, Berkeley)

  • Skrzypacz, Andrzej

    (Stanford University)


We study a dynamic market with asymmetric information that creates the lemons problem. We compare efficiency of the market under different assumptions about the timing of trade. We identify positive and negative aspects of dynamic trading, describe the optimal market design under regularity conditions and show that continuous-time trading can be always improved upon.

Suggested Citation

  • Fuchs, William & Skrzypacz, Andrzej, 2013. "Costs and Benefits of Dynamic Trading in a Lemons Market," Research Papers 2133, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:2133

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Maarten C. W. Janssen & Santanu Roy, 2002. "Dynamic Trading in a Durable Good Market with Asymmetric Information," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 257-282, February.
    2. Biais, Bruno & Glosten, Larry & Spatt, Chester, 2005. "Market microstructure: A survey of microfoundations, empirical results, and policy implications," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 217-264, May.
    3. Fuchs, William & Öry, Aniko & Skrzypacz, Andrzej, 2016. "Transparency and distressed sales under asymmetric information," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(3), September.
    4. Georg Noldeke & Eric van Damme, 1990. "Signalling in a Dynamic Labour Market," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(1), pages 1-23.
    5. Veronica Guerrieri & Robert Shimer & Randall Wright, 2010. "Adverse Selection in Competitive Search Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(6), pages 1823-1862, November.
    6. Emiliano Pagnotta & Thomas Philippon, 2011. "Competing on Speed," NBER Working Papers 17652, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Thomas Philippon & Vasiliki Skreta, 2012. "Optimal Interventions in Markets with Adverse Selection," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 1-28, February.
    8. Samuelson, William F, 1984. "Bargaining under Asymmetric Information," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(4), pages 995-1005, July.
    9. Maarten C. W. Janssen & Vladimir A. Karamychev, 2002. "Cycles and multiple equilibria in the market for durable lemons," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 20(3), pages 579-601.
    10. Mas-Colell, Andreu & Whinston, Michael D. & Green, Jerry R., 1995. "Microeconomic Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195102680, June.
    11. Kaya, Ayça & Liu, Qingmin, 2015. "Transparency and price formation," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 10(2), May.
    12. Jean Tirole, 2012. "Overcoming Adverse Selection: How Public Intervention Can Restore Market Functioning," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 29-59, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Songzi Du & Haoxiang Zhu, 2014. "Welfare and Optimal Trading Frequency in Dynamic Double Auctions," NBER Working Papers 20588, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Piero Gottardi & Sarah Auster, 2016. "Competing Mechanisms in Markets for Lemons," 2016 Meeting Papers 264, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Adelino, Manuel & Gerardi, Kristopher S. & Hartman-Glaser, Barney, 2016. "Are Lemons Sold First? Dynamic Signaling in the Mortgage Market," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2016-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, revised 01 Feb 2017.
    4. William Fuchs & Andrzej Skrzypacz, 2013. "Bargaining with Deadlines and Private Information," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 219-243, November.
    5. Timothy Perri, 2016. "Does signalling solve the lemons problem?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 227-229, March.
    6. Fuchs, William & Green, Brett & Papanikolaou, Dimitris, 2016. "Adverse selection, slow-moving capital, and misallocation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(2), pages 286-308.
    7. Dino Gerardi & Lucas Maestri, 2013. "Bargaining over a Divisible Good in the Market for Lemons," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 312, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    8. Grenadier, Steven R. & Malenko, Andrey & Strebulaev, Ilya A., 2014. "Investment busts, reputation, and the temptation to blend in with the crowd," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 137-157.
    9. Bond, Philip & Zhong, Hongda, 2016. "Buying high and selling low: stock repurchases and persistent asymmetric information," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67011, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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