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Fleshing out the monetary transmission mechanism: output composition and the role of financial frictions

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  • Müller, Gernot J.
  • Meier, André

Abstract

Financial frictions affect the way in which different components of GDP respond to a monetary policy shock. We embed the financial accelerator of Bernanke, Gertler and Gilchrist (1999) into a medium-scale Dynamic General Equilibrium model and evaluate the relative importance of financial frictions in explaining monetary transmission. Specifically, we match the impulse responses generated by the model with empirical impulse response functions obtained from a vector autoregression on US time series data. This allows us to provide estimates for the structural parameters of our model and judge the relevance of different model features. In addition, we propose a set of simple and instructive specification tests that can be used to assess the relative fit of various restricted models. Although our point estimates suggest some role for financial accelerator effects, they are actually of minor importance for the descriptive success of the model. JEL Classification: E32, E44, E51

Suggested Citation

  • Müller, Gernot J. & Meier, André, 2005. "Fleshing out the monetary transmission mechanism: output composition and the role of financial frictions," Working Paper Series 500, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:2005500
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
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    5. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 27-48, Fall.
    6. Angeloni, Ignazio & Kashyap, Anil K. & Mojon, Benoît & Terlizzese, Daniele, 2003. "The output composition puzzle: a difference in the monetary transmission mechanism in the euro area and U.S," Working Paper Series 268, European Central Bank.
    7. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 2004. "A Critique of Structural VARs Using Real Business Cycle Theory," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000000518, UCLA Department of Economics.
    8. Amato, Jeffery D. & Laubach, Thomas, 2003. "Estimation and control of an optimization-based model with sticky prices and wages," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(7), pages 1181-1215, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chadha, Jagjit S. & Corrado, Luisa & Holly, Sean, 2014. "A Note On Money And The Conduct Of Monetary Policy," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(08), pages 1854-1883, December.
    2. Poilly, Céline, 2010. "Does money matter for the identification of monetary policy shocks: A DSGE perspective," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 2159-2178, October.
    3. Rannenberg, Ansgar, 2012. "Asymmetric Information in Credit Markets, Bank Leverage Cycles and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62035, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Wen Yao, 2012. "International Business Cycles and Financial Frictions," Staff Working Papers 12-19, Bank of Canada.
    5. Nolan, Charles & Thoenissen, Christoph, 2009. "Financial shocks and the US business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 596-604, May.
    6. Henzel, Steffen & Hülsewig, Oliver & Mayer, Eric & Wollmershäuser, Timo, 2009. "The price puzzle revisited: Can the cost channel explain a rise in inflation after a monetary policy shock?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 268-289, June.
    7. Ali Dib & Ian Christensen, 2005. "Monetary Policy in an Estimated DSGE Model with a Financial Accelerator," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 314, Society for Computational Economics.
    8. Mayer, Eric & Grimm, Oliver, 2008. "Countercyclical taxation and price dispersion," W.E.P. - Würzburg Economic Papers 78, University of Würzburg, Chair for Monetary Policy and International Economics.
    9. František Brazdik & Michal Hlavacek & Aleš Marsal, 2012. "Survey of Research on Financial Sector Modeling within DSGE Models: What Central Banks Can Learn from It," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 62(3), pages 252-277, July.
    10. Jagjit S. Chadha & Luisa Corrado & Sean Holly, 2008. "Reconnecting Money to Inflation: The Role of the External Finance Premium," Studies in Economics 0816, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    11. De Graeve, Ferre, 2008. "The external finance premium and the macroeconomy: US post-WWII evidence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 3415-3440, November.
    12. Cohen-Cole, Ethan & Morse, Jonathan, 2010. "Monetary policy and capital regulation in the US and Europe," Working Paper Series 1222, European Central Bank.
    13. Cwik, Tobias & Müller, Gernot J. & Wolters, Maik H., 2011. "Does trade integration alter monetary policy transmission?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 545-564, April.
    14. Ethan Cohen-Cole & Enrique Martínez-García, 2011. "The Balance Sheet Channel," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Rodrigo Alfaro (ed.), Financial Stability, Monetary Policy, and Central Banking, edition 1, volume 15, chapter 9, pages 255-297 Central Bank of Chile.
    15. Hirakata, Naohisa & Sudo, Nao & Ueda, Kozo, 2011. "Do banking shocks matter for the U.S. economy?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 2042-2063.
    16. Fuchi, Hitoshi & Muto, Ichiro & Ugai, Hiroshi, 2005. "A Historical Evaluation of Financial Accelerator Effects in Japan's Economy," MPRA Paper 4648, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Selim Elekdag & Alejandro Justiniano & Ivan Tchakarov, 2006. "An Estimated Small Open Economy Model of the Financial Accelerator," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 53(2), pages 1-2.
    18. Natalia T. Tamirisa & Alain N. Kabundi & Deniz O Igan & Francisco d Nadal De Simone & Marcelo Pinheiro, 2009. "Three Cycles; Housing, Credit, and Real Activity," IMF Working Papers 09/231, International Monetary Fund.
    19. Mayer, Eric & Hülsewig, Oliver & Henzel, Steffen & Wollmershäuser, Timo, 2006. "The Price Puzzle Revisited: Can the Cost Channel explain a Rise in Inflation after a Monetary Shock?," W.E.P. - Würzburg Economic Papers 74, University of Würzburg, Chair for Monetary Policy and International Economics.
    20. Virginia Queijo, 2005. "Bayesian Estimation of a DSGE Model with Financial Frictions for the U.S. and the Euro Area," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 306, Society for Computational Economics.
    21. Merola, Rossana, 2010. "Optimal monetary policy in a small open economy with financial frictions," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2010,01, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    22. Queijo, Virginia, 2005. "How Important are Financial Frictions in the U.S. and Euro Area?," Seminar Papers 738, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    23. Gelain, Paolo, 2010. "The external finance premium in the euro area A useful indicator for monetary policy?," Working Paper Series 1171, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial frictions; Minimum Distance Estimation; monetary policy; Output Composition;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers

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