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Do banking shocks matter for the U.S. economy?

  • Naohisa Hirakata
  • Nao Sudo
  • Kozo Ueda

The quantitative significance of shocks to the financial intermediary (FI) has not received much attention up to now. We estimate a DSGE model with what we describe as chained credit contracts, using Bayesian technique. In the model, credit-constrained FIs intermediate funds from investors to credit-constrained entrepreneurs through two types of credit contract. We find that the shocks to the FIs' net worth play an important role in the investment dynamics, accounting for 17 percent of its variations. In particular, in the Great Recession, they are the key determinants of the investment declines, accounting for 36 percent of the variations.

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File URL: http://www.dallasfed.org/assets/documents/institute/wpapers/2011/0086.pdf
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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its series Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper with number 86.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddgw:86
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  1. Naohisa Hirakata & Nao Sudo & Kozo Ueda, 2011. "Capital Injection, Monetary Policy, and Financial Accelerators," IMES Discussion Paper Series 11-E-10, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
  2. De Graeve, Ferre, 2008. "The external finance premium and the macroeconomy: US post-WWII evidence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 3415-3440, November.
  3. Jermann, Urban & Quadrini, Vincenzo, 2009. "Macroeconomic Effects of Financial Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 7451, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Meier, André & Müller, Gernot J., 2005. "Fleshing out the monetary transmission mechanism: output composition and the role of financial frictions," Working Paper Series 0500, European Central Bank.
  5. Ireland, Peter N., 2003. "Endogenous money or sticky prices?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(8), pages 1623-1648, November.
  6. Ian Christensen & Ali Dib, 2008. "The Financial Accelerator in an Estimated New Keynesian Model," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 155-178, January.
  7. Kevin Moran & Cesaire Meh, 2004. "Bank Capital, Agency Costs, and Monetary Policy," 2004 Meeting Papers 318, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. David Aikman & Matthias Paustian, 2006. "Bank capital, asset prices and monetary policy," Bank of England working papers 305, Bank of England.
  9. Chen, Nan-Kuang, 2001. "Bank net worth, asset prices and economic activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 415-436, October.
  10. Naohisa Hirakata & Nao Sudo & Kozo Ueda, 2009. "Chained Credit Contracts and Financial Accelerators," IMES Discussion Paper Series 09-E-30, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
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