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An Eye-Tracking Study of Feature-Based Choice in One-Shot Games

  • Giovanna Devetag
  • Sibilla Di Guida
  • Luca Polonio

We analyze subjects’ eye movements while they make decisions in a series of one-shot games. The majority of them perform a partial and selective analysis of the payoff matrix, often ignoring the payoffs of the opponent and/or paying attention only to specific cells. Our results suggest that subjects apply boundedly rational decision heuristics that involve best responding to a simplification of the decision problem, obtained either by ignoring the other players’ motivations or by considering them only for a subset of outcomes. Finally, we find a correlation between types of eye movements observed and choices in the games.

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File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/138438/1/2013-06-DEVATAG_DIGUIDA_POLONIO.pdf
File Function: 2013-06-DEVATAG_DIGUIDA_POLONIO
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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series Working Papers ECARES with number ECARES 2013-06.

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Length: 53 p.
Date of creation: Jan 2013
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Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/138438
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