IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

East Asian Economic Integration and its Impact on Future Growth


  • Philippa Dee

    (Crawford School of Economics and Government)


Two propositions appear to be gaining wide currency, given the revealed preference for preferential trade agreements (PTAs) in the East Asian region and elsewhere. The first is that economic integration is a good way to promote economic growth. The second is that PTAs, particularly ones that go beyond goods trade, are an effective way to promote economic integration. Yet both propositions are empirical questions. In this paper, a partial evaluation of the evidence suggests caution is called for. Current PTAs appear to be doing little to remove the important impediments to growth in the region. Far greater income gains would come from comprehensive reform of nondiscriminatory impediments to competition, as part of a thorough-going program of unilateral domestic regulatory reform. It may be time to rethink East Asian economic integration as a policy priority, or at least review the way in which it might be pursued.

Suggested Citation

  • Philippa Dee, 2005. "East Asian Economic Integration and its Impact on Future Growth," Development Economics Working Papers 21988, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:21988

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Arief Ramayandi, 2005. "ASEAN Monetary Cooperation: Issues and Prospects," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 349, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Dollar, David & Micco, Alejandro & Clark, Ximena, 2002. "Maritime transport costs and port efficiency," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2781, The World Bank.
    3. David Vanzetti & Greg McGuire & Prabowo, 2005. "Trade Policy at the Crossroads: The Indonesian Story," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 347, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kirkegaard, Jacob Funk, 2012. "Transactions: A New Look at Service Sector Foreign Direct Investment in Asia," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 318, Asian Development Bank.
    2. Balistreri, Edward J. & Jensen, Jesper & Tarr, David, 2015. "What determines whether preferential liberalization of barriers against foreign investors in services are beneficial or immizerising: Application to the case of Kenya," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-134.
    3. Jane Korinek & Mark Melatos, 2009. "Trade Impacts of Selected Regional Trade Agreements in Agriculture," OECD Trade Policy Papers 87, OECD Publishing.
    4. Hiro Lee & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 2007. "Regional Integration, Sectoral Adjustments and Natural Groupings in East Asia," OSIPP Discussion Paper 07E008, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    5. Shiro Armstrong, 2010. "Taiwan's Asia Pacific Economic Strategies Post-ECFA," EABER Working Papers 22810, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    6. Christopher Findlay, 2011. "Services Trade and Investment Liberalization," Chapters,in: The Economics of East Asian Integration, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Lee, Hiro & Owen, Robert F. & van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique, 2009. "Regional integration in Asia and its effects on the EU and North America," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 240-254, May.
    8. repec:uts:finphd:35 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Rolf J. Langhammer, 2008. "Sectoral Distortions and Service Protection in Russia: A Comparison with Benchmark Emerging Markets and EU Accession Candidates," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(6), pages 70-83, November.
    10. Philippa Dee, 2008. "The role of microeconomic policy reform in regional integration  analytical and empirical issues," EABER Working Papers 21793, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    11. Baldwin, Richard, 2010. "Sequencing regionalism: Theory, European practice, and lessons for Asia," CEPR Discussion Papers 7852, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Philippa Dee, 2010. "Alternative Growth Strategies in Asia: Liberalization, Deregulation, Structural Reforms," Chapters,in: Asian Regionalism in the World Economy, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Peter DRYSDALE & Shiro ARMSTRONG, 2010. "International and Regional Cooperation: Asia's Role and Responsibilities," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 5(2), pages 157-173, December.

    More about this item


    East Asia; economic integration; trade; Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eab:develo:21988. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shiro Armstrong). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.