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The European Debt Crisis and Fiscal Reaction Functions in Europe 2000-2012

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Listed:
  • Guido Baldi
  • Karsten Staehr

Abstract

After the global financial crisis, some governments in the EU experienced serious debt financing problems, while others were less affected. This paper seeks to shed light on the divergent fiscal performance by assessing the fiscal conduct in the EU countries before and after the outbreak of the crisis. Fiscal reaction functions of the primary balance are estimated for different groups of EU countries using quarterly data for the pre-crisis period 2001-2008 and for the post-crisis period 2009-2012. The pre-crisis estimations reveal some differences in persistence and cyclical reaction between different groups of countries, but generally little feedback from the debt stock to the primary balance. The countries that eventually developed fiscal problems do not stand out. The post-crisis estimations show less counter-cyclicality and much more feedback from the debt stock, and these reactions are particularly pronounced for the countries with severe fiscal problems.

Suggested Citation

  • Guido Baldi & Karsten Staehr, 2013. "The European Debt Crisis and Fiscal Reaction Functions in Europe 2000-2012," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1295, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1295
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Piotr Ciżkowicz & Andrzej Rzońca & Rafał Trzeciakowski, 2015. "Windfall of Low Interest Payments and Fiscal Sustainability in the Euro Area: Analysis through Panel Fiscal Reaction Functions," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(4), pages 475-510, November.
    2. Baldi, Guido & Staehr, Karsten, 2016. "The European debt crisis and fiscal reactions in Europe 2000-2014," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 297-317.
    3. Jörg Decressin & Raphael A Espinoza & Ioannis Halikias & Michael Kumhof & Daniel Leigh & Prakash Loungani & Paulo A Medas & Susanna Mursula & Antonio Spilimbergo & TengTeng Xu, 2015. "Wage Moderation in Crises; Policy Considerations and Applications to the Euro Area," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 15/22, International Monetary Fund.
    4. repec:liu:liucej:v:14:y:2017:i:2:p:161-175 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:liu:liucej:v:14:y:2017:i:2:p:157-160 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Cuestas, Juan Carlos & Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Staehr, Karsten, 2014. "Government debt dynamics and the global financial crisis: Has anything changed in the EA12?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 64-66.
    7. Vladimir Andrić & Milojko Arsić & Aleksandra Nojković, 2016. "Public Debt Sustainability In Serbia Before And During The Global Financial Crisis," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 61(210), pages 47-78, July - Se.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal reaction function; global financial crisis; debt crisis; structural break;

    JEL classification:

    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H62 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Deficit; Surplus
    • H63 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt

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