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How beliefs about the impact of immigration shape policy preferences: Evidence from Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Jérôme Héricourt

    () (EQUIPPE, Universités de Lille, Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

  • Gilles Spielvogel

    () (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, UMR 201)

Abstract

This paper studies the joint determination of beliefs about the economic impact of immigration and immigration policy preferences, using data from the five waves of the European Social Survey (2002- 2010). In addition to standard socioeconomic characteristics, this analysis takes into account individual media consumption as a determinant of opinion about immigration. Our results stress the important role of the endogenous determination of beliefs, which appear as a major determinant of policy preferences. Besides, media exposure appears as a key determinant of beliefs: individuals spending more time to get informed on social and political matters through newspapers and radio have a better opinion on the economic impact of immigration relatively to individuals which devote time to other types of contents. _________________________________ Cet article étudie la détermination conjointe des croyances concernant l'impact économique de l'immigration et des préférences en matière de politiques migratoires, en utilisant les données provenant des cinq vagues de l'European Social Survey (2002-2010). En plus des caractéristiques socio-économiques classiques, cette analyse prend en compte l'exposition aux médias en tant que déterminant de l'opinion sur l'immigration. Nos résultats soulignent le rôle clé de la formation endogène des croyances, qui apparaissent comme un déterminant majeur de préférences en matière de politiques migratoires. Par ailleurs, l'exposition aux médias est un déterminant important des croyances: les individus passant plus de temps à s'informer sur les questions sociales et politiques à travers la presse écrite et la radio ont une opinion plus positive de l'impact économique de l'immigration, relativement aux individus qui consacrent du temps à d'autres types de contenu.

Suggested Citation

  • Jérôme Héricourt & Gilles Spielvogel, 2012. "How beliefs about the impact of immigration shape policy preferences: Evidence from Europe," Working Papers DT/2012/06, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
  • Handle: RePEc:dia:wpaper:dt201206
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    File URL: http://www.dial.ird.fr/media/ird-sites-d-unites-de-recherche/dial/documents/publications/doc_travail/2012/2012-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Card & Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2012. "Immigration, Wages, And Compositional Amenities," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 78-119, February.
    2. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Caroline Halls, 2010. "Assessing the Fiscal Costs and Benefits of A8 Migration to the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 31(1), pages 1-41, March.
    3. Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Who Is Against Immigration? A Cross-Country Investigation of Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 510-530, August.
    4. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda & Riccardo Puglisi, 2009. "Illegal Immigration and Media Exposure: Evidence on Individual Attitudes," Development Working Papers 285, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    5. Marco Manacorda & Alan Manning & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2012. "The Impact Of Immigration On The Structure Of Wages: Theory And Evidence From Britain," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 120-151, February.
    6. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri, 2016. "Rethinking The Effect Of Immigration On Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 2, pages 35-80 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    7. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Sides, John & Citrin, Jack, 2007. "European Opinion About Immigration: The Role of Identities, Interests and Information," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 37(03), pages 477-504, July.
    9. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Kenneth F. Scheve & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2001. "Labor Market Competition And Individual Preferences Over Immigration Policy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 133-145, February.
    11. Hainmueller, Jens & Hiscox, Michael J., 2007. "Educated Preferences: Explaining Attitudes Toward Immigration in Europe," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(02), pages 399-442, April.
    12. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
    13. Christina Boswell, 2009. "Knowledge, Legitimation and the Politics of Risk: The Functions of Research in Public Debates on Migration," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 57, pages 165-186, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hatton, Timothy J., 2014. "Public Opinion on Immigration: Has the Recession Changed Minds?," IZA Discussion Papers 8248, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International migration; beliefs; preferences; attitudes; media; Migrations internationales; croyances; préférences; opinion; médias.;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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