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The effect of news on the radicalization of public opinion towards immigration

Author

Listed:
  • Massimiliano Agovino
  • Maria Rosaria Carillo
  • Nicola Spagnolo

Abstract

This paper analyses the effects of newspaper coverage and the tone of news on immigration on the attitude of natives towards immigration in 19 countries (World Values Survey Database) for the period 2005-2009. The results can be summarised as follows: coverage and the negative tone of news have a significant effect in reducing the attitudes towards immigration for people with high trust in the media; for those with low trust in the media, news on immigration has no significant effects. In the latter case coverage and the negative tone of news radicalizes individuals’ prior preferences and prejudices on immigration, where the latter are proxied by individual political orientations.

Suggested Citation

  • Massimiliano Agovino & Maria Rosaria Carillo & Nicola Spagnolo, 2016. "The effect of news on the radicalization of public opinion towards immigration," Discussion Papers 1_2016, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:crj:dpaper:1_2016
    as

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    File URL: http://www.crisei.uniparthenope.it/wp/materiale/crisei_dp_01_2016.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fuzzy analysis; Immigration; News;

    JEL classification:

    • H89 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Other
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • Z19 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Other

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