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Does Central Europe Import the Missing Women Phenomenon?

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  • Alexander Stimpfle
  • David Stadelmann

Abstract

We examine whether immigrants have brought the missing women phenomenon to Germany and Switzerland. Using a range of micro data since 1990, we find no systematic gender selection of foreigners collectively, but a group of Balkan, Chinese and Indian immigrants display comparatively high sex ratios at birth. Employing different estimation methods we consistently calculate around 1,500 missing girls in Germany (2003-2014) and Switzerland (1990-2014) combined from these selected Balkan and Asian immigrant groups. A Germany-specific measure of cultural adaptation has no substantial effect on the level of son preference, and Swiss-specific data indicate a skewed ratio for fourth parity births. With household survey data we attempt to identify underlying reasons for son preference in Germany, but find no robust associations for any socio-economic variable employed. However, the sex of older siblings tends to matter, and again Balkan, Chinese and Indian immigrants increase the boy-birth likelihood whereas immigrants collectively do not.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Stimpfle & David Stadelmann, 2016. "Does Central Europe Import the Missing Women Phenomenon?," CREMA Working Paper Series 2016-04, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
  • Handle: RePEc:cra:wpaper:2016-04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Missing Women; Sex Ratio at Birth; Son Preference; Migration;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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