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The Age Distribution of Missing Women in India

  • Siwan Anderson


  • Debraj Ray

Relative to developed countries, there are far fewer women than men in India. Estimates suggest that more than 25 million women are "missing". Sex selection at birth and the mistreatment of young girls are widely regarded as key explanations. A decomposition of missing women by age across the states of India is done. The state-wise variation in the distribution of missing women across the age groups makes it very difficult to draw simple conclusions to explain the missing women phenomenon in India. [BREAD Working Paper No. 326]. URL:[].

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Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:4842.

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Date of creation: Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:4842
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  1. Bloch, Francis & Rao, Vijayendra, 2000. "Terror as a bargaining instrument : a case study of dowry violence in rural India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2347, The World Bank.
  2. Sylvie Dubuc & David Coleman, 2007. "An Increase in the Sex Ratio of Births to India-born Mothers in England and Wales: Evidence for Sex-Selective Abortion," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(2), pages 383-400.
  3. D. Jayaraj, 2009. "Exploring The Importance Of Excess Female Mortality And Discrimination In "Natality" In Explaining The "Lowness" Of The Sex Ratio In India," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 47(2), pages 177-201.
  4. Deaton, Angus S, 1989. "Looking for Boy-Girl Discrimination in Household Expenditure Data," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 3(1), pages 1-15, January.
  5. Jason Abrevaya, 2009. "Are There Missing Girls in the United States? Evidence from Birth Data," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 1-34, April.
  6. Dhairiyarayar Jayaraj & Sreenivasan Subramanian, 2004. "Women's Wellbeing and the Sex Ratio at Birth: Some Suggestive Evidence from India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 91-119.
  7. Kochar, Anjini, 1999. "Evaluating Familial Support for the Elderly: The Intrahousehold Allocation of Medical Expenditures in Rural Pakistan," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(3), pages 620-56, April.
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