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Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions

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  • Fisman, Raymond
  • Gatti, Roberta

Abstract

We develop a simple bargaining framework of corruption where firms pay bribes to avoid regulation. Consistent with this setup, we find that time spent bargaining with bureaucrats and amount of bribe payments are positively correlated, but that this association is weaker (and, thus, corruption more 'efficient') when the terms of unofficial contracts are known to the firms. We also show that institutional arrangements that result in lower uncertainty in bargaining for bribes attenuate the impact of corruption on firm growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Fisman, Raymond & Gatti, Roberta, 2006. "Bargaining for Bribes: The Role of Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 5712, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:5712
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert, 1999. "The Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 222-279, April.
    2. Jakob Svensson, 2003. "Who Must Pay Bribes and How Much? Evidence from a Cross Section of Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(1), pages 207-230.
    3. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    4. Daniel Kaufmann & Shang-Jin Wei, 1999. "Does "Grease Money" Speed Up the Wheels of Commerce?," NBER Working Papers 7093, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Keefer, Philip, 2001. "When do special interests run rampant ? disentangling the role in banking crises of elections, incomplete information, and checks and balances," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2543, The World Bank.
    6. Juan C. Botero & Simeon Djankov & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "The Regulation of Labor," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(4), pages 1339-1382.
    7. Cadot, Olivier, 1987. "Corruption as a gamble," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 223-244, July.
    8. Paolo Mauro, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712.
    9. Lawrence M. Ausubel & Raymond J. Deneckere, 1993. "Efficient Sequential Bargaining," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 435-461.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Blackburn, Keith & Forgues-Puccio, Gonzalo F., 2009. "Why is corruption less harmful in some countries than in others?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 797-810, December.
    2. Helble, Matthias & Shepherd, Ben & Wilson, John S., 2007. "Transparency, trade costs, and regional integration in the Asia Pacific," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4401, The World Bank.
    3. Lant Pritchett & Mary Hallward-Driemeier, 2010. "How Business is Done and the 'Doing Business' Indicators: The Investment Climate when Firms have Climate Control," CID Working Papers 211, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    4. Mary Hallward-Driemeier & Lant Pritchett, 2015. "How Business Is Done in the Developing World: Deals versus Rules," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 121-140, Summer.
    5. Vial, Virginie & Hanoteau, Julien, 2010. "Corruption, Manufacturing Plant Growth, and the Asian Paradox: Indonesian Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 693-705, May.
    6. repec:eee:iburev:v:27:y:2018:i:1:p:218-230 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Jensen, Nathan M. & Li, Quan & Rahman, Aminur, 2007. "Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter : understanding corruption using cross-national firm-level surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4413, The World Bank.
    8. Jensen, Nathan M & Rahman, Aminur, 2011. "The silence of corruption : identifying underreporting of business corruption through randomized response techniques," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5696, The World Bank.
    9. Roberta Gatti & Matteo Morgandi & Rebekka Grun & Stefanie Brodmann & Diego Angel-Urdinola & Juan Manuel Moreno & Daniela Marotta & Marc Schiffbauer & Elizabeth Mata Lorenzo, 2013. "Jobs for Shared Prosperity : Time for Action in the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13284.

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