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Does Size Matter? Scale, Corruption and Uncertainty

  • Gonzalo F. Forgues-Puccio
  • Ibrahim M. Okumu

We study the role of the size of the economy in mitigating the impact of public sector corruption on economic development. The analysis is based on a dynamic general equilibrium model in which growth occurs endogenously through the invention and manufacture of new intermediate goods that are used in the production of output. Potential innovators decide to enter the market considering the fraction of future profits that may be lost to corruption. We find that depending on the predictability of bribes, the size of the economy may be an important factor in determining the effects of corruption on innovation and economic growth.

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Paper provided by Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis in its series CDMA Working Paper Series with number 201207.

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Date of creation: 01 Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:san:cdmawp:1207
Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Economics and Finance, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9AL
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