IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ioe/cuadec/v49y2012i2p277-305.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Does Corruption Affect Economic Growth?

Author

Listed:
  • Eatzaz Ahmad
  • Muhammad Aman Ullah
  • Muhammad Irfanullah Arfeen

Abstract

Using panel data from the International Country Risk Guide corruption index, institutional quality and political stability indices and several state variables for developed and developing countries, this paper explores the linear quadratic empirical relationship between corruption and economic growth. Empirical literature has shown a linear relationship between corruption and economic growth but hasn’t dif ferentiated between growthenhancing and growth-reducing levels of corruption. An analysis based on the generalized method of moments estimation shows that a decrease in corruption raises the economic growth rate in an inverted U-shaped way. This result is robust with respect to alternative specifications of the econometric relationship.

Suggested Citation

  • Eatzaz Ahmad & Muhammad Aman Ullah & Muhammad Irfanullah Arfeen, 2012. "Does Corruption Affect Economic Growth?," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 49(2), pages 277-305, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ioe:cuadec:v:49:y:2012:i:2:p:277-305
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.economia.uc.cl/docs/107764_laje_492277.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raul A. Barreto, 2001. "Endogenous Corruption, Inequality and Growth: Econometric Evidence," School of Economics Working Papers 2001-02, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    2. Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "How Taxing is Corruption on International Investors?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 1-11, February.
    3. Kaufman, Daniel & Shang-Jin Wei, 1999. "Does"grease money"speed up the wheels of commerce?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2254, The World Bank.
    4. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    5. Alesina, Alberto & Özler, Sule & Roubini, Nouriel & Swagel, Phillip, 1996. "Political Instability and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 189-211, June.
    6. Lui, Francis T, 1985. "An Equilibrium Queuing Model of Bribery," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(4), pages 760-781, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kuboniwa, Masaaki, 2014. "The Impact of Oil Prices, Total Factor Productivity and Institutional Weakness on Russia’s Declining Growth," RRC Working Paper Series 49, Russian Research Center, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. repec:pid:journl:v:55:y:2016:i:4:p:689-702 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Huang, Chiung-Ju, 2016. "Is corruption bad for economic growth? Evidence from Asia-Pacific countries," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 247-256.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1318-1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; economic growth; institutional quality; bureaucratic; efficiency; political stability;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • P48 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Political Economy; Legal Institutions; Property Rights; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Regional Studies

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ioe:cuadec:v:49:y:2012:i:2:p:277-305. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jaime Casassus). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iepuccl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.