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Endogenous Corruption, Inequality and Growth: Econometric Evidence

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  • Raul A. Barreto

    () (School of Economics, University of Adelaide)

Abstract

This paper empirically addresses three questions. First, what is corruption's effect on economic growth? Second, what are the factors that determine corruption? Third, what is the relationship among corruption, economic growth, and income distribution? I use a cross section of countries, both developed and underdeveloped. I find that corruption is an important determinant of both per-capita real growth and of the distribution of income. Corruption is positively and significantly correlated with growth, implying that corruption has efficiency-enhancing qualities. Corruption is positively and significantly correlated with inequality, implying that increased income inequality is associated with greater corruption. The most robust specification, which associates three jointly dependent equations using a two-stage least squares estimation technique, reinforces the proposition that corruption enhances efficiency, justifies inequality's role in determining growth rates, and lends support to the theory of international convergence of growth rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Raul A. Barreto, 2001. "Endogenous Corruption, Inequality and Growth: Econometric Evidence," School of Economics Working Papers 2001-02, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:2001-02
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    File URL: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/research/papers/doc/wp2001-02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Anand, Sudhir & Kanbur, S. M. R., 1993. "The Kuznets process and the inequality--development relationship," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 25-52, February.
    6. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    7. Robert Summers & Alan Heston, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950–1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-368.
    8. Park, Walter G & Brat, David A, 1995. "A Global Kuznets Curve?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 105-131.
    9. Adelman, Irma & Robinson, Sherman, 1989. "Income distribution and development," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 19, pages 949-1003 Elsevier.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eatzaz Ahmad & Muhammad Aman Ullah & Muhammad Irfanullah Arfeen, 2012. "Does Corruption Affect Economic Growth?," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 49(2), pages 277-305, November.
    2. Sdiri, Hanen & Ayadi, Mohamed, 2016. "Does innovation foster or mitigate the corruption obstacle? Firm-level evidence from Tunisia," MPRA Paper 71088, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Soldatos, Gerasimos T., 2014. "Bureaucracy, Underground Activities, and Fluctuations," MPRA Paper 60858, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Axel Dreher & Thomas Herzfeld, 2005. "The Economic Costs of Corruption: A Survey and New Evidence," Public Economics 0506001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Ambar, Rabnawaz, 2015. "Corruption, Inequality and Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 70375, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2015.
    6. Dawood Mamoon, 2012. "Economic security, well functioning courts and a good government," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(8), pages 587-611, June.
    7. Dawood Mamoon, 2006. "Which Institutions Are More Relevant Than Others in Inequality Mitigation?," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 893-912.
    8. Soldatos, Gerasimos T., 2015. "A Bilateral Monopsony Approach to Lending, and the Hidden Economy in LDCs," MPRA Paper 66896, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    endogenous growth; corruption;

    JEL classification:

    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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