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The ECB's Two Pillars

  • Gerlach, Stefan

This Paper suggests a formal interpretation of the ECB’s two-pillar framework for monetary policy. I decompose inflation in the euro area into high- and low-frequency (or short-run and medium/long-run) components, which are correlated with monetary growth and the output gap, respectively. I proceed to propose and estimate a ‘two-pillar’ Phillips curve that assumes that money causes prices. While the model fits well and the causality assumption seems compatible with the 1980-90 data, there appears to be reverse causality from prices to money in the 1991-2001 period, which would invalidate my model.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3689.

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Date of creation: Jan 2003
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3689
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  1. Nicoletti-Altimari, Sergio, 2001. "Does money lead inflation in the euro area?," Working Paper Series 0063, European Central Bank.
  2. Gabriel Fagan & JÊrÆme Henry, 1998. "Long run money demand in the EU: Evidence for area-wide aggregates," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 483-506.
  3. Lars E.O. Svensson & Stefan Gerlach, 2001. "Money and inflation in the Euro Area: A case for monetary indicators?," BIS Working Papers 98, Bank for International Settlements.
  4. Cogley, Timothy, 2002. "A Simple Adaptive Measure of Core Inflation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(1), pages 94-113, February.
  5. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Causality, cointegration, and control," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 551-559.
  6. McCallum, Bennett T., 1984. "On low-frequency estimates of long-run relationships in macroeconomics," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-14, July.
  7. Trecroci, Carmine & Vega, Juan Luis, 2000. "The information content of M3 for future inflation," Working Paper Series 0033, European Central Bank.
  8. Fuhrer, Jeffrey C, 1997. "The (Un)Importance of Forward-Looking Behavior in Price Specifications," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(3), pages 338-50, August.
  9. Ben Bernanke & Frederic Mishkin, 1992. "Central Bank Behavior and the Strategy of Monetary Policy: Observations From Six Industrialized Countries," NBER Working Papers 4082, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Joaquim Vieira Ferreira Levy & Alessandro Calza & Dieter Gerdesmeier, 2001. "Euro Area Money Demand; Measuring the Opportunity Costs Appropriately," IMF Working Papers 01/179, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Brand, Claus & Cassola, Nuno, 2000. "A money demand system for euro area M3," Working Paper Series 0039, European Central Bank.
  12. Paul De Grauwe & Magdalena Polan, 2001. "Is Inflation Always and Everywhere a Monetary Phenomenon?," International Economics Working Papers Series wpie009, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën, International Economics.
  13. Buiter, Willem H, 1984. "Granger-Causality and Policy Effectiveness," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 51(202), pages 151-62, May.
  14. Coenen, Günter & Vega, Juan Luis, 1999. "The demand for M3 in the euro area," Working Paper Series 0006, European Central Bank.
  15. Fagan, Gabriel & Henry, Jérôme & Mestre, Ricardo, 2001. "An area-wide model (AWM) for the euro area," Working Paper Series 0042, European Central Bank.
  16. Thomas J. Sargent, 1981. "The ends of four big inflations," Working Papers 158, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  17. Claus Brand & Dieter Gerdesmeier & Barbara Roffia, 2002. "Estimating the trend of M3 income velocity underlying the reference value for monetary growth," Occasional Paper Series 03, European Central Bank.
  18. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521788885 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Stefan Gerlach, 1995. "Testing the quantity theory using long-run averaged cross-country data," BIS Working Papers 31, Bank for International Settlements.
  20. De Grauwe, Paul & Polan, Magdalena, 2001. "Is Inflation Always and Everywhere a Monetary Phenomenon?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2841, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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