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Unequal Gains, Prolonged Pain: A Model of Protectionist Overshooting and Escalation

Author

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  • Blanchard, Emily
  • Willmann, Gerald

Abstract

We develop a model of democratic political responses to macroeconomic shocks in the short and long run. We show that when economic adjustment is slower than potential political change, exogenous changes in the global marketplace can trigger populist surges in favor of distortionary economic policies. Applied to trade policy, our model demonstrates that an exogenous terms-of-trade improvement or skill-biased technological change will lead to a spike in protectionism that blunts the younger generation's incentive to acquire education. In the long run, the initial surge in protectionism will gradually diminish if and only if education enables less-skilled workers to catch up with the overall economy. The more unequal the initial distribution of human capital, the greater and longer-lasting the protectionist backlash will be: unequal gains, prolonged pain. Evidence on key data markers suggested by the model exhibits patterns consistent with recent populist support for Brexit and Trump.

Suggested Citation

  • Blanchard, Emily & Willmann, Gerald, 2018. "Unequal Gains, Prolonged Pain: A Model of Protectionist Overshooting and Escalation," CEPR Discussion Papers 13160, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13160
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Dynamic Political Economy; education; Endogenous Tari; Human Capital; Overlapping Generations; Overshooting; populism; protectionism;

    JEL classification:

    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • F5 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy

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