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Scarcity of science and engineering students in the Netherlands

Author

Listed:
  • Joëlle Noailly

    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Daniël Waagmeester

    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Bas Jacobs

    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Marieke Rensman

    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Dinand Webbink

    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

Abstract

In this report, we investigate whether policies that stimulate enrolment in S&E-studies are effective at increasing R&D-activity. Scarcity of science and engineering (S&E) graduates could potentially call for government intervention, because of the role of S&E's in R&D, and because R&D in turn is characterised by positive spillovers. First, we analyse the situation on the Dutch labour market for S&E graduates. We do not find evidence for scarcity of S&E graduates. Rather, the labour market position vis-à-vis other graduates weakened. A possible explanation to reconcile this conclusion with a widely felt concern of S&E shortages among employers is increasing internationalisation of the S&E labour market. Concerning policy, we argue that expanding the stock of S&E graduates is not very effective for boosting R&D activity. More than half the number of S&E graduates do not end up working in R&D. De increasing internationalisation of the S&E labour market can diminish the attractiveness of S&E courses.

Suggested Citation

  • Joëlle Noailly & Daniël Waagmeester & Bas Jacobs & Marieke Rensman & Dinand Webbink, 2005. "Scarcity of science and engineering students in the Netherlands," CPB Document 92, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpb:docmnt:92
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kox, Henk L.M., 2011. "The future of the fence around the European labour market," MPRA Paper 31722, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Joëlle Noailly & Dinand Webbink & Bas Jacobs, 2011. "Should the government stimulate enrolment in science and engineering studies?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 371-375.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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