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Borrowing from Employees: Wage Dynamics with Financial Constraints

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  • Claudio Michelacci
  • Vincenzo Quadrini

Abstract

We analyze how the financial conditions of the firm affect the compensation structure of workers, the size of the firm, and its dynamics. Firms that are financially constrained offer long-term wage contracts characterized by an increasing wage profile, that is, they pay lower wages today in exchange of higher future wages, effectively borrowing form their employees. Because constrained firms also operate at a suboptimal scale, which then increases gradually over time, we have that younger and smaller firms grow faster and pay lower wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudio Michelacci & Vincenzo Quadrini, 2005. "Borrowing from Employees: Wage Dynamics with Financial Constraints," Working Papers wp2005_0501, CEMFI.
  • Handle: RePEc:cmf:wpaper:wp2005_0501
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    Cited by:

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    2. Juan-José Ganuza & Gerard Llobet & Beatriz Domínguez, 2009. "R& D in the Pharmaceutical Industry: A World of Small Innovations," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(4), pages 539-551, April.
    3. Schnabel, Claus & Kohaut, Susanne & Brixy, Udo, 2008. "Employment Stability of Entrants in Newly Founded Firms: A Matching Approach Using Linked Employer-Employee Data from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 3353, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    6. Luigi Guiso & Luigi Pistaferri & Fabiano Schivardi, 2013. "Credit within the Firm," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 211-247.
    7. José Cerón & Javier Suarez, 2006. "Hot and Cold Housing Markets: International Evidence," Working Papers wp2006_0603, CEMFI.
    8. Claus Schnabel & Susanne Kohaut & Udo Brixy, 2011. "Employment stability in newly founded firms: a matching approach using linked employer–employee data from Germany," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 85-100, January.
    9. Bo Gao & Jing Ma & Zheng Wang, 2021. "The employment and wage effects of export VAT rebates: evidence from China," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 157(2), pages 347-373, May.
    10. Aleix Calveras & Juan-José Ganuza & Gerard Llobet, 2005. "Regulation and Opportunism: How Much Activism Do We Need?," Working Papers wp2005_0508, CEMFI.
    11. Neus Herranz & Stefan Krasa & Anne P. Villamil, 2015. "Entrepreneurs, Risk Aversion, and Dynamic Firms," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 123(5), pages 1133-1176.
    12. Arabzadeh, Hamzeh & Balleer, Almut & Gehrke, Britta, 2020. "Uncovering the mechanism(s): Financial constraints and wages," CEPR Discussion Papers 15585, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Boeri, Tito & Jimeno, Juan F., 2016. "Learning from the Great Divergence in unemployment in Europe during the crisis," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 32-46.
    14. Javier Díaz-Giménez & Josep Pijoan-Mas, 2006. "Flat Tax Reforms in the U.S.: A Boon for the Income Poor," Working Papers wp2006_0611, CEMFI.
    15. Boeri, Tito & Garibaldi, Pietro & Moen, Espen R, 2015. "Financial Frictions, Financial Shocks and Unemployment Volatility," CEPR Discussion Papers 10648, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    16. Jan Zabojnik, 2014. "Stock-based Compensation Plans And Employee Incentives," Working Paper 1325, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    17. Neus Herranz, & Stefan Krasa, & Anne P. Villamil, 2013. "Entrepreneurs, Risk Aversion and Dynamic Firms," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 189, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    18. Khalid ElFayoumi, 2020. "Firm Financing and the Relative Demand for Labor and Capital," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1908, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    19. Jan Babecky & Kamil Galuscak & Diana Zigraiova, 2017. "Wage Dynamics and Financial Performance: Evidence from Czech Firms," Working Papers 2017/14, Czech National Bank.
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    21. Gu, Tao, 2019. "Wage determination and fixed capital investment in an imperfect financial market: the case of China," MPRA Paper 95986, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G31 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Capital Budgeting; Fixed Investment and Inventory Studies
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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