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Monetary Emissions Trading Mechanisms

  • Cyril Monnet
  • Ted Temzelides

Emissions trading mechanisms have been proposed, and in some cases implemented, as a tool to reduce pollution. We explore the similarities between emission-trading mechanisms and monetary mechanisms. Both attempt to implement desirable allocations under various frictions, including risk and private information. In addition, implementation relies on the issue and trading of objects whose value is at least partially determined by expectations, namely money and permits, respectively. We use insights from dynamic mechanism design in monetary economics to derive properties of dynamic emissions trading mechanisms. At the optimum, the price of permits must increase over time. Efficient tax policies are state-contingent, and there is an equivalence between state-contingent taxes and emissions trading. Restrictions resulting from the money-like feature of permits can break this equivalence when there is endogenous progress in clean technologies. These restrictions must be taken into consideration in actual policy implementation.

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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 4633.

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Date of creation: 2014
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4633
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  1. Requate, Till, 2005. "Dynamic incentives by environmental policy instruments--a survey," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 175-195, August.
  2. Daron Acemoglu & Philippe Aghion & Leonardo Bursztyn & David Hemous, 2012. "The Environment and Directed Technical Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 131-66, February.
  3. Garth Heutel, 2012. "How Should Environmental Policy Respond to Business Cycles? Optimal Policy under Persistent Productivity Shocks," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 244-264, April.
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  6. COLLA, Paolo & GERMAIN, Marc & VAN STEENBERGHE, Vincent, 2005. "Environmental policy and speculation on markets for emission permits," CORE Discussion Papers 2005066, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  7. Blyth, William & Bradley, Richard & Bunn, Derek & Clarke, Charlie & Wilson, Tom & Yang, Ming, 2007. "Investment risks under uncertain climate change policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5766-5773, November.
  8. Marc Germain & Vincent Van Steenberghe & Alphonse Magnus, 2004. "Optimal Policy with Tradable and Bankable Pollution Permits: Taking the Market Microstructure into Account," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 6(5), pages 737-757, December.
  9. Yihsu Chen & Chung-Li Tseng, 2011. "Inducing Clean Technology in the Electricity Sector: Tradable Permits or Carbon Tax Policies?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 169-174.
  10. Silvia Albrizio & Helia Costa, 2012. "Policy Uncertainty and Investment in Low-Carbon Technology," Economics Working Papers ECO2012/27, European University Institute.
  11. De Perthuis, Christian & Convery, Frank J. & Ellerman, Denny, 2010. "Pricing carbon : the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/10174, Paris Dauphine University.
  12. Zhe Li & Shouyong Shi, 2010. "Emission Tax or Standard? The Role of Productivity Dispersion," Working Papers tecipa-409, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
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